Author Topic: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk  (Read 24433 times)

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nivuahc

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Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« on: February 04, 2010, 09:19:20 AM »
Okay, I just need to get this off my chest... and be forewarned; a ginormous wall-o-text follows.

When I started the project that I'm currently working on, a few months ago, I was given a handful of CAD files from our customer with instructions to make our drawings "look just like these". That was what I had to go on. I asked if I could, possibly, speak with their CAD Manager only to be told that they didn't have one.

Unfortunately, the "go by" drawings were not consistent. At all. So I asked for a list of CAD Standards. What I got was an Excel file with a list of colors and pen weights.

My plan of action, at that point, was to take the drawings that I had and use the largest number of consistencies and consider those "standard". In other words, even though some of the drawings showed a different dimension style than the others, the dimension style I chose was the one that was used most often. Same thing for text styles, callouts, etc. And, to be frank, they were ugly. Really nasty. Stuff that just didn't make any sense. But the main function of our design/drafting team is to mimic what our customer is doing. Like it or not, we had to follow their "standard".

I wrote a few lisp routines to create those standards, created some palettes with "standard" blocks, created a profile using all of that information, and loaded that palette on the few machines we had in the office at the time. Due to the large number of drawings, and the way that the project is broken up, I decided it would be best to setup Sheet Sets for each individual area. I setup the provided border with fields to update automagically, figuring that the least amount of time that each person spent doing things, like updating information in the border, the better. Shockingly (to me, anyway) I had to teach everyone on our team about Sheet Set Manager. I had to teach all of them about Fields. And, to be honest, some of them still have difficulty with both from time to time.

Fast forward a couple of weeks and our design/drafting team has doubled in size. And the customer sends us some more "go by" drawings which essentially negate the path I'd taken previously. Now the majority of these "go by" drawings showed a slightly different set of "majority rules" standards. Easy enough to implement, not so easy on the designers and drafters who had gotten used to doing it a certain way. Again, I asked if we could have a copy of whatever documentation they were using to create their drawings. I got nothing in return.

Fast forward another week or so and, essentially, we get the same thing happening all over again. Again, our team had doubled in size and, again, our customer sent us more drawings as well as mark-ups of drawings that we'd submitted to them, which meant changing some of those standards around. Again, I ask for something... anything... that would provide me with a little insight, other than these "go by" drawings and, again, I got nothing.

Fast forward a few weeks and, lo and behold, we get a completely different set of drawings from the client. Nearly every thing about this set of drawings is different from what we'd done so far. But, get this... they looked great! "Make all of your drawings look like this" was what we were told and, to be honest, I was extremely happy about that. Decent looking blocks, decent looking dimensions, decent looking everything. And, if that weren't good enough I got word that we'd been sent some bonafide CAD Standards.

Well the CAD Standards consisted of a couple of pages out of a larger document concerning file names. And drawing names. And how they had to be a certain way and how the information in the border needed to reflect different data than we'd originally been lead to believe. Talk about a huge PITA. That meant going back through all of the existing work that we'd done and changing the Sheet Sets for each area and then replacing the block of attributes in the border with an updated version. Simple enough but a PITA nonetheless.

But the cloud above my head over that bit o' crap was out-shined by the fact that we could now start producing drawings that, in my opinion, actually looked good. I even wrote a couple of routines to change any existing drawings to incorporate those changes, once they were opened by anyone. Replace all of those ugly symbols with the new stuff, update those text and dimension styles to the new and improved stuff, and take care of any little things (within reason) to eliminate a lot of extra work on the teams part.

About two weeks later I get emailed to me a 20+ page document titled "CAD Standards" from the client. It's dated August of 2007 but, guess what... it confirmed a lot of the things that I'd implemented on our end, and it didn't change things so much that it was going to make my head asplode. I start working on a revised edition of the CAD Standard, updating the things that I know have changed, and making the whole thing usable for our office.

And everything was (finally) right in the world.

Or so I thought. :(

About a week ago I get an email asking me to contact the CAD Manager for our client, along with a phone number and email address. :O

So I did, and it was an enlightening conversation. Evidently he's been kept in the dark about what, exactly, we were doing and why. He had only recently (within the past couple of days) learned that we were doing the work that we were doing. And he was, understandably, a little miffed about that. I had a nice long conversation with him and, much to my relief, he actually "gets it" when it comes to standards. When it comes to how drawings should look, we seem to be on the same exact page. And then he dropped a small bomb on me that almost made me drop the phone.

It seems that our drawings are confusing his users. For some reason, we put a "block or something" in place of the text in the border and "they don't know how to edit that".

After I picked my jaw up off of my desk, I explained to him that those were attributes with fields that get updated automagically via information stored in Sheet Set Manager. Based on the silence coming over the phone, I proceeded to give a brief overview of Sheet Set Manager and Fields. "Wow" was his response and "you guys really have it setup right down there" followed shortly thereafter with "I wish we had ours setup like that but I know my users wouldn't be able to figure it all out". I volunteered to write up some easy to understand documentation. I volunteered to setup sheet sets for all of his drawings and teach anyone at their office that needed to know, how to use it. My offer was greeted with "sure, you can do that if you want... but it's just going to slow our guys down so I doubt we'll use it."

And then he tells me that he'd like us to change the way we're saving our drawings. He'd like these very large areas of work to all be setup as separate layouts in a single drawing so that it's easier for his users to navigate through their folders. Yeah, okay, I can understand why he thinks that that's the simplest solution... but I've currently got our group working in teams, each of them tackling a different area at a time, all of them working on adjoining sheets for the area, seeing each others work with overlaid xrefs. And just one type of drawing that we're producing, as an example, might be as many as 8 sheets. Putting all 8 sheets in one drawing file means that only one person can work on the drawing at a time. The other option is to have some users working on read-only files, or locally stored files, and copy-pasting their work at the end of the day.

Part of the reason that I setup Sheet sets in the first place was to keep the users from doing any file management on the network. I don't want users poking around on the network, deleting drawings or moving them, if I can help it. And another reason that I chose to utilize Sheet Set Manager is because I don't want the users to have to navigate their way around the network trying to find their drawings.

My frustration level is higher, right now, than it has been in a long time. Here's the thing; they are the customer. They are the ones who write the checks. They are the ones who get to say how things should be. Without some very crafty convincing on my part, it looks like I'm going to have to change the way our team of 25 people does things. It took a little while for my users to get accustomed to Sheet Set Manager and, now that they've gotten used to it, they're a little spoiled by it. Essentially, it looks like I'm going to have to take away a good bit of the usefulness of Sheet Set Manager now and, quite honestly, it's enough to make me want a stiff drink.  :ugly:

mjfarrell

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2010, 09:29:02 AM »
I feel you're pain....

I once did some temp work on a job....

everytime I asked what 'their' standard was for something I couldn't figure out, I was told what the standard was....only to be immediately followed by "but we didn't do it that way on that job" :ugly:

...sooooo

what's the point of having standards IF you know they are NOT being followed?
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Bob Wahr

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2010, 09:29:25 AM »
Kind of a PITF but have two sets of files, one for production, the other submittals.  Work in the serparated drawings, then update the others to submit.

Mark

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2010, 10:04:35 AM »
Quote
It seems that our drawings are confusing his users. For some reason, we put a "block or something" in place of the text in the border and "they don't know how to edit that".
LOL

I know its not funny for you but for me .... *giggle*

been there done that!
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Chuck Gabriel

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2010, 10:42:26 AM »
I'm with Bob on this one.  It might be a pain, but not as much as changing your entire workflow AGAIN.  You could probably automate a lot of the work needed to create your submittal package, and your team could keep right on doing things the way you trained them to.

Birdy

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2010, 10:57:23 AM »
...it's enough to make me want a stiff drink.  :ugly:
Glad to hear things are improving!!! :-)

nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2010, 11:12:29 AM »
I'm with Bob on this one.  It might be a pain, but not as much as changing your entire workflow AGAIN.  You could probably automate a lot of the work needed to create your submittal package, and your team could keep right on doing things the way you trained them to.

I'm inclined to agree. Hell, I'll even take care of combining the drawings after-the-fact myself... but one of the first things that he and I agreed upon was that, in order to keep things running as smoothly as possible, it would be in everyone's best interest if we replicated their network file/folder structure over here so that drawing interchange could be (virtually) seamless. If they needed to work on our drawings, no problem, and, likewise, if we needed to work on theirs, wouldn't want to create any issues. He and I are (at this point, anyhow) going to take it upon ourselves to update the shared FTP site with our work on a daily basis. So, yeah, there's that.

JCTER

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2010, 11:13:29 AM »
That sounds like a cluster bomb of disaster waiting to happen.

nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2010, 11:17:01 AM »
That sounds like a cluster bomb of disaster waiting to happen.

Doesn't it? But here's the thing... if they have to work on our drawings he's (supposedly) going to let me know ahead of time and, under normal circumstances, they'd only ever be working on drawings that we'd submitted some time back (i.e. we aren't working on any longer). And same thing on our end.

So, under normal circumstances, it shouldn't be an issue. But I'm figuring out that his definition of "normal" and mine... maybe they don't mean the same thing.

JCTER

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2010, 11:31:31 AM »
I get very scared when I think about having multiple versions of the same drawing, with nothing but the "saved by" and "last modified" dates to indicate so :\

I ended up on that road once and it still hurts, thinking about it.

If they're only working on drawing you guys -are- done with and -have- issued finals of, then it may not be a problem, and maybe Bob's idea will still work just fine... just run the routine to mutate the drawing sets before uploading to the FTP site.  Just like you were doing an issued set... just more often.  I know some people who have to bind (and explode once) all their xref's for their submitted drawings, but still work with xref's in house for obvious benefits. 

Good luck with it all.  Sounds like you got it all under control to get it done the best way.

nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2010, 11:44:46 AM »
I know some people who have to bind (and explode once) all their xref's for their submitted drawings, but still work with xref's in house for obvious benefits.

At the moment... that'd be us.

And that's part of what I'm trying to eliminate.

It was only two weeks ago that I convinced them to allow me to submit drawings in something other than 2004 format.





Seriously. :|

They are running 2009 and 2010. They don't even have a copy of an earlier version of AutoCAD in the office. The Engineer previously in charge (he took another position at a different company half-way across the country, and now another guy is in charge) insisted that we submit our drawings that way (as well as submitting DWF's of the same drawings) for whatever reason (that I can't figure out).

M-dub

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2010, 12:10:36 PM »
I too, feel your pain.
It's one of those jobs where you so badly want to do it right, but "Right" is not how the client wants it done.  You just have to turn your brain off and do it.  I always hate putting my initials in those drawings... it's like you're telling future CAD folks that you had a hand in making that mess.

Chuck Gabriel

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2010, 12:12:12 PM »
It sounds to me like "right" doesn't even exist (at least not for more than a week or so at a time).

nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2010, 12:22:11 PM »
It sounds to me like "right" doesn't even exist (at least not for more than a week or so at a time).

Pretty much. The way we refer to it in the office is that the client "keeps moving the goal posts". I'd love to say that these sort of shenanigans are limited to drawing standards but, sadly, the whole project has been this way from day 1. The materials that we're getting our information from to create our drawings (P&ID's, Spreadsheets, Riser Diagrams) get changed, we don't get notified about it, we get b*tched at for having wrong information on our drawings.  :ugly:

In fact, our Project Manager flew out there yesterday and, today, he is in a meeting with the project engineering staff up there, explaining why not giving us up-to-date information is dumb.

JohnK

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2010, 12:35:46 PM »
<snip>
 one of the first things that he and I agreed upon was that, in order to keep things running as smoothly as possible, it would be in everyone's best interest if we replicated their network file/folder structure over here so that drawing interchange could be (virtually) seamless. If they needed to work on our drawings, no problem, and, likewise, if we needed to work on theirs, wouldn't want to create any issues. He and I are (at this point, anyhow) going to take it upon ourselves to update the shared FTP site with our work on a daily basis. So, yeah, there's that.

Just completed one of those jobs. Small PITA, but defiantly do-able.

The biggest tip(s) i will offer is to use a batch script for downloading and uploading your drawings to the ftp server. And to use network standards not local ones. Provide your people with TOOLS (palettes, dashboard, stuff) not blocks and word documents.
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nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2010, 01:02:37 PM »
The biggest tip(s) i will offer is to use a batch script for downloading and uploading your drawings to the ftp server.
Already on it. There's no way I plan to sit here and do it manually.

And to use network standards not local ones.
That was the first thing that I did, actually. The only local thing I have setup is that my main routine checks for an existence of acaddoc.lsp in the (strcat (getvar "ROAMABLEROOTPREFIX") "Support\\") folder (which isn't there by default). It then copies one to their hard drive that contains a routine to put everything back to normal when they lose their network connection (it happens every now and then).

Provide your people with TOOLS (palettes, dashboard, stuff) not blocks and word documents.
On this bit, I agree. And that's basically what I do. But I also have a habit of explaining everything (too much at times) so that everyone (hopefully) understands it. For instance, I wrote a routine that creates conduit rack cross section drawings, spacing the conduits out for them, eliminating the need for them to look up spacings on a chart. I think the PDF I put together to explain it (complete with screenshots of the tool in action) was ~14 pages.  :oops:

My PDF on Sheet Set Manager was ~22 pages.  :oops:

mjfarrell

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #16 on: February 04, 2010, 01:18:02 PM »
there should be no reason to replicate network drive letters....Hello RELATIVE paths

unless of course you are using data shortcuts or similar that CANT use relative paths
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nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2010, 01:33:28 PM »
there should be no reason to replicate network drive letters....Hello RELATIVE paths

unless of course you are using data shortcuts or similar that CANT use relative paths

except that THEY use full path instead of relative and it just so happened to work out that we both had the same drive letter setup already.

mjfarrell

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2010, 01:35:51 PM »
there should be no reason to replicate network drive letters....Hello RELATIVE paths

unless of course you are using data shortcuts or similar that CANT use relative paths

except that THEY use full path instead of relative and it just so happened to work out that we both had the same drive letter setup already.

could be that introducing them to the benefits of RELATIVE pathing are in order  .. or NOT
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nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #19 on: February 04, 2010, 01:41:46 PM »
there should be no reason to replicate network drive letters....Hello RELATIVE paths

unless of course you are using data shortcuts or similar that CANT use relative paths

except that THEY use full path instead of relative and it just so happened to work out that we both had the same drive letter setup already.

could be that introducing them to the benefits of RELATIVE pathing are in order  .. or NOT

Dude... they're confused about attributes.   :?

I'm taking the advice of a former boss on this one.

"When you've got an entire elephant to eat, you just eat it one bite at a time."

All of our XRef's are relative pathed. I'm just going to leave it at that (for now, at least) and see what comes of it. If I don't get a panic call from their CAD Manager about all of our missing xref's, I'll consider it a closed book.

mjfarrell

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2010, 01:43:47 PM »
they WONT be missing any XREF's and that IS exactly the point of using relative pathing

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JohnK

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2010, 01:55:34 PM »
why are you focusing on xref paths? there are many solutions for dealing with paths. -e.g. put in the "project name" var in all the drawings just in case.
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Krushert

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #22 on: February 04, 2010, 02:10:08 PM »
they WONT be missing any XREF's and that IS exactly the point of using relative pathing



Right now with Coca Cola project I am on and with having whole range of design/engineering/process/rat consultants spread all over the US and a couple of other continents, we use relative path and a designated folder path structure and we still have a xref go missing from time to time.  And then we have people crying "I thought relative pathing was suppose not alow this to happen.  Yadaa Yadaa.   Please I can figure out who is a bigger moron the person crying or the person that did not follow the rules to the exact letter and punctuation.

 So your statement above is not entire true.  using relative pathing is not a silver bullet becuase people are people.
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dgorsman

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #23 on: February 04, 2010, 02:14:01 PM »
Right.  If people don't want to learn, you can't make them.  Legally at least   :angel:
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Krushert

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #24 on: February 04, 2010, 02:27:44 PM »
Right.  If people don't want to learn, you can't make them.  Legally at least   :angel:
What do you think lobster bait is?   :wink:
I + XI = X is true ...  ... if you change your perspective.

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mjfarrell

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #25 on: February 04, 2010, 03:08:51 PM »
In THEORY
they WONT be missing any XREF's and that IS exactly the point of using relative pathing


unless of course they (______________) insert something totally lame, and well than ALL BETS are OFF irrespective of what your standards , or drive mappings are.




Happy Now?
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Krushert

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2010, 03:15:02 PM »
Happy Now?
Not until 4:30 and I twist off with a Capt Elis.  :wink:

MY frustration is not with you but your statement.  I have heard it too much the past two years.  :x
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nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2010, 05:26:38 PM »
Well I just got some refreshing news...

Seems like the Project Manager was able to convey a lot of our frustrations with the right people. Looks like our client is turning all of their drawings over to us and letting us finish the project on our own. So, if I understand everything correctly (waiting on tomorrow morning's meeting with the PM), we not only don't have to worry about how the client is doing things, we can improve the way we're doing things without worrying about someone blowing a gasket.

I'll keep my fingers crossed.  :-)

JCTER

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2010, 05:27:37 PM »
WIN!

Greg B

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #29 on: February 05, 2010, 08:48:35 AM »
And maybe that company will asked to contract someone out to teach them all the cool stuff you can do.

Shinyhead

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2010, 09:27:26 AM »
I cant tell you the number of times we have heard that one of our clients would love to learn how to set things up the way we do. They would love to get training from us, onsite support to make the transition, etc.
But when they realize we would like to actually get paid to do any of that...  well, we have not had too many takers yet.  Not many are willing to put their money where their mouth is.

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2010, 09:34:05 AM »
yeah...I suppose that is more likely the case.  I should have though of how I'd react to it.

Me...I'd ask questions and try to figure it out on my own to save a few bucks.

Oh well.


(ponder)(now where to put my next post)(ponder)

nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2010, 09:51:17 AM »
And maybe that company will asked to contract someone out to teach them all the cool stuff you can do.

Funny you should say that...

I'm headed off to a meeting with our business manager to discuss my upcoming trip to New York. I'm flying out on Monday and returning on Friday. I'm, evidently, to go to the clients office and "get their sh!z in order".

Somebody pinch me.  :kewl:

Mark

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2010, 10:48:10 AM »
I'm headed off to a meeting with our business manager to discuss my upcoming trip to New York. I'm flying out on Monday and returning on Friday. I'm, evidently, to go to the clients office and "get their sh!z in order".
Have fun!! I hope you get through to them.
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nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2010, 12:38:00 PM »
I'm headed off to a meeting with our business manager to discuss my upcoming trip to New York. I'm flying out on Monday and returning on Friday. I'm, evidently, to go to the clients office and "get their sh!z in order".
Have fun!! I hope you get through to them.

Well my meeting went well...

Evidently, I'm going there to try and make heads or tails out of what they are doing, where they are getting their information, how that information is being parsed out to the proper people, and setting up a system to make it all work. And then I'm taking it back home and we're going to do it ourselves.

I'm both extremely excited and a wee bit nervous. This means that the burden of responsibility shifts completely onto our shoulders. I'm actually just fine with that and prefer it. I'm confident in our group of people to do what needs to be done, and to do it right. I know it's going to create more work, up front, for us... but it really is the way things should have happened from the beginning. I'm probably not going to be a very popular guy in New York but it is what it is.

mjfarrell

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2010, 12:40:54 PM »
you might want to leave the 'I'm taking this all with me when I leave' OUT of anyconversation you have in NY.  Just to make sure you can.   :wink:
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nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #36 on: February 15, 2010, 07:48:46 AM »
So, I'm back from the client's job site...

What a miserable week it's been.

The good news; well, we can pretty much do what we want with our drawings, on our end of things. My users can continue to utilize Sheet Set Manager to keep them organized and happy. And it looks like I'll be developing CAD Standards for, not only our office, but their office as well. They love the things that I've done and seem happy to let me guide them (other than Sheet Set Manager, which they think is hawt, but believe that their users won't be able to figure it out so they just won't use it).

The bad news; I had an idea of this, heading out there, but didn't really get how much it impacted our work until now. There are people on site who have a vested interest in seeing us fail. Unfortunately, some of those people control the information that we need to do our job properly. Getting up-to-date information, updated drawings from the different trades, and updated submittals is going to be a nightmare.

Now the client realizes that this is a problem for us. And they want to make it right. Part of what I did while I was up there was to put together a procedures manual for the sharing of information. The intent is to get the client to sign off on it and enact it as law. They've asked to have someone from our group (me, initially) move up there and act as a document control manager for them. Well that's just not going to work. Not just because I have no desire (whatsoever) to live in that state (they would have to pay me a ginormous amount of money to even consider it) it's not quite as simple as "put someone in place to do the job".

And I can imagine what sorts of questions you might be asking yourself...

"Why doesn't he just take the job?"
"Why doesn't he just go up there, temporarily, to see the project through?"
"Why don't they just send someone else from your company to do it?"
"Hell, why doesn't he just contact the different trades himself and get those updated drawings and information on his own?"


One word: Unions

Simply put, we're not a union shop, they all are. We're not allowed to communicate with them and, if we tried, we'd get nothing but the cold shoulder (and our client would get a ton of political backlash from it).

See, the mindset of most of the people that I talked to while I was up there was "milk this project for as long as possible, regardless of how much it costs, as long as I'm getting a paycheck". Because, evidently, it's almost impossible to fire someone who is in the union.

My mindset, and the mindset of the group that I'm working with, is "do the best job that we can, at as little a cost to our client as possible, so that they'll continue to feed us additional projects".

Do you see how those two mindsets conflict with one another?

And it's not as simple as telling the client "Hey, we're not getting updated information from your people" because the people who are checking our work... well, they're the same people who are controlling the flow of vital pieces of information. The same people who have a vested interest in seeing us fail.

So, as it stands right now, unless the client agrees to the document control procedures that I've written up, and unless they make someone (an on-site union someone) accountable for getting us the information that we need, and unless they actually enforce the following of those procedures, I'll be happy to have a job in the next couple of weeks, along with everyone else on our team.

I did drink more alcohol on this trip than I have in the past year, so at least I have that.

Bob Garner

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #37 on: February 15, 2010, 10:15:44 AM »
Well, I think you did a DAMN good job with what you had to work with.  My compliments to you!

Bob G.

nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #38 on: February 15, 2010, 10:21:05 AM »
Thanks, Bob.

Bob Wahr

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #39 on: February 15, 2010, 05:20:22 PM »
Where is "up there?" Quite a few people here are looking for work.  Might it make sense to hire a person who isn't a complete screw-up and can grasp what you're doing to be the on-site person for the duration?

nivuahc

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #40 on: February 15, 2010, 05:44:21 PM »
New Yawk

Bob Wahr

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #41 on: February 15, 2010, 05:48:40 PM »
Figured New York or New Jersey.  Ran into that union attitude some surveying around there.

mjfarrell

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #42 on: February 15, 2010, 08:09:59 PM »
New Yawk

Not a problem....I think I've just the right(wrong) attitude for those folks...send me on up there.  ;-)

That and document Date:Time stamp all Request for Information....perhaps even send copies of same to everyone, even IF they do not have the data...then everyone will know you are after it. :|
« Last Edit: February 15, 2010, 08:17:08 PM by mjfarrell »
Be your Best


Michael Farrell
http://primeservicesglobal.com/

MattHar

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #43 on: February 21, 2010, 01:55:46 AM »
I truly feel your pain. I am also finding my self in a similar conflicting moment with a client. We hand out a CD set of drawings with each submittal to be check for compliance to the clients standards. They failed our submittal because we used Annotative text for multiple viewports over the floorplans for multiple buildings, and she said, "if i don't understand it i don't want it on my drawings." Which meant for our department to break apart each section of the floorplan and adjust the text to show correctly on the layout. Beguiled by her ignorance I then went to ask, what about clipping xref's... which totally screwed us... it meant we had to change our Xref system, (which previously had a master file with several sections designated for individual layouts) because she didn't understand what XCLIP does.... so on and so forth... pain in the ass now but saves us our next failure... at least i hope, now to satisfy them we had to revert back to the way things were done in r12....

and she told us we were unprofessional....

how ignorant....

Krushert

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #44 on: February 21, 2010, 04:29:39 PM »
That is total unbeliavable Matthar.   :-o  But I do run across simialr stories "but milder" but I have never run across the atidude as that.  Thoght my boss has moments like that but just back to R2000.   :evil:  :-D

BTW Welcome to TheSwamp!
I + XI = X is true ...  ... if you change your perspective.

I no longer CAD or Model, I just hang out here picking up the empties beer cans

Birdy

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Re: Tales from the CAD Manager's desk
« Reply #45 on: February 22, 2010, 07:50:51 AM »
...she said, "if i don't understand it i don't want it on my drawings."

Would have to try real hard to resist the temptation to send her a blank document.
"How's that?" :evil: