Author Topic: .NET Help  (Read 15432 times)

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Josh Nieman

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.NET Help
« on: March 05, 2008, 02:51:38 PM »
Maybe we should have a section in the Teach Me forum for .NET in general?  Seems lots of people are showing interest in this language...

anyways...

I'm having a bit of trouble finding some good beginner resources or basic setup how-to guides for starting out with either VB.NET or C# in .NET

I don't care which I learn, heck at this point, whichever one reveals itself to have better resources in distribution will win my practice.

I am a total noob though, and most of what I see is people already experienced, already knowledgable, already with a good foundation of knowledge of programming talking about .NET and I get lost quickly.

Any help for the newb?

Kerry

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2008, 02:56:36 PM »
C# Programming Course (free)
Quote from: Jon Jagger
These are the full slides and notes for my 5 day instructor led course on C# Programming. All other instructor led courses I know of have to be booked "blind" - you don't know what you're getting until you get it. This course is different - you can look at it and decide. You can even, as an individual, learn C# from it. Feel free to publicise the course and to create hyperlinks to this page.


http://www.jaggersoft.com/csharp_course/index.html

... for a start.
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quamper

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2008, 03:05:00 PM »
The .NET Labs Section on the Autodesk web page has both the Videos and the lab
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/index?siteID=123112&id=1911627

This has the one video + some of the other verticals/other products videos
http://through-the-interface.typepad.com/through_the_interface/2007/11/devtv-introduct.html

Josh Nieman

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2008, 03:06:37 PM »
The .NET Labs Section on the Autodesk web page has both the Videos and the lab
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/index?siteID=123112&id=1911627

This has the one video + some of the other verticals/other products videos
http://through-the-interface.typepad.com/through_the_interface/2007/11/devtv-introduct.html

Oh crud!!

I have the Autodesk downloaded to my desktop and forgot to check them out.  Man, I never see my computer desktop and sometimes forget the stuff I've put on it.

I think I have the other, too, but I'll be sure to check it out.

C# Programming Course (free)
Quote from: Jon Jagger
These are the full slides and notes for my 5 day instructor led course on C# Programming. All other instructor led courses I know of have to be booked "blind" - you don't know what you're getting until you get it. This course is different - you can look at it and decide. You can even, as an individual, learn C# from it. Feel free to publicise the course and to create hyperlinks to this page.


http://www.jaggersoft.com/csharp_course/index.html

... for a start.


Thanks much!  I've bookmarked this.

MP

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2008, 03:25:21 PM »
The .NET Labs Section on the Autodesk web page has both the Videos and the lab
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/index?siteID=123112&id=1911627

{Smacks self upside head} Thanks Q, I didn't know that one existed.

http://www.jaggersoft.com/csharp_course/index.html

Nor that one; thanks KB.

Don't know about anyone else but I like the O'Reilly books, and am currently enjoying C# 3.0, Fifth Ed.
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Glenn R

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2008, 03:27:57 PM »
I would STRONGLY suggest you avoid the temptation to leap into anything relating to AutoCAD and start trying to learn programming from that, just because it's related to what you already know.

Instead, I would recommend you learn the constructs of programming and the language (whichever you choose) FIRST, before even attempting to apply it to AutoCAD.

I would search amazon for programming related books at the beginner level - there are some good ones out there.

Cheers,
Glenn.
Me

CmdrDuh

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2008, 03:35:57 PM »
To add to everything thus said, I would go with C# (which I did) because you will find much more help here at theswamp for C# than VB.Net IMHO.
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MP

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2008, 03:37:06 PM »
I would STRONGLY suggest you avoid the temptation to leap into anything relating to AutoCAD and start trying to learn programming from that, just because it's related to what you already know.

Instead, I would recommend you learn the constructs of programming and the language (whichever you choose) FIRST, before even attempting to apply it to AutoCAD.

I would search amazon for programming related books at the beginner level - there are some good ones out there.

Cheers,
Glenn.

Fully agree. Difficult to do, akin to that "Harry met Sally" moment ... (paraphrased) "When you realize what you want to do with the rest of your life, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible". With programming that enthusiastic "jump right in" approach can be detrimental as one will often develop and employ really bad programming habits by coding application centric solutions right off. Better to defer until one's fundamentals are solid. Opinions vary. :)
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quamper

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2008, 03:38:04 PM »
I would search amazon for programming related books at the beginner level - there are some good ones out there.

I'm personally a huge fan of the Apress C# books..

MP

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2008, 03:45:00 PM »
I would search amazon for programming related books at the beginner level - there are some good ones out there.

I'm personally a huge fan of the Apress C# books..

I find the Apress books hit and miss. However Troelsen is very credible author and his Apress book(s) same. I have this one, just haven't read much of it yet as I'm powering thru the O'Reilly C# book as well as a Python one (yeah, need a life).
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quamper

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2008, 03:47:16 PM »

I find the Apress books hit and miss. However Troelsen is very credible author and his Apress book(s) same. I have this one, just haven't read much of it yet as I'm powering thru the O'Reilly C# book as well as a Python one (yeah, need a life).

That one you linked is great! I also really like this one alot http://www.amazon.com/Illustrated-C-2008-Daniel-Solis/dp/1590599543/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1204749878&sr=1-1

If you are a visual learner that might be right up your alley as everything has illustrations.

MP

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2008, 03:50:34 PM »
Thanks Q, I will have to check that one out.  8-)
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Josh Nieman

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2008, 04:16:24 PM »
Yikes...

Have to say, the suggestion to not dive into Autocad related stuff is a pretty offputting suggestion.  Typically I find pouring over soulless code and commands to be pretty darn boring if I don't care one cent about what it's doing or know that very quickly it's going to be to my benefit, even if it is just for creating good "habits"

I have bad habits with my programming as it is, and it's worked beautifully for me so far.  I don't do programs for anyone else, or for anyone else to pick up, nor will it ever hurt my feelings if someone looks at my code and says "EGAD that's the ugliest piece of garbage I've ever muddled through reading" so long as it does what I want it to.

All suggestions will be taken to heart, though, because I do have an urge to do this one "right" unlike my LSP and limited vb experience.

I'm just, VERY much, a dive right in, get it done, work hard, get results.. kind of guy.

Nathan Taylor

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2008, 04:21:43 PM »
I would STRONGLY suggest you avoid the temptation to leap into anything relating to AutoCAD and start trying to learn programming from that, just because it's related to what you already know.

Instead, I would recommend you learn the constructs of programming and the language (whichever you choose) FIRST, before even attempting to apply it to AutoCAD.

I would search amazon for programming related books at the beginner level - there are some good ones out there.

Cheers,
Glenn.

Absolutely.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-au/beginner/default.aspx

Kerry

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2008, 04:34:01 PM »
I would STRONGLY suggest you avoid the temptation to leap into anything relating to AutoCAD and start trying to learn programming from that, just because it's related to what you already know.

Instead, I would recommend you learn the constructs of programming and the language (whichever you choose) FIRST, before even attempting to apply it to AutoCAD.

I would search amazon for programming related books at the beginner level - there are some good ones out there.

Cheers,
Glenn.

I concur, wholeheartedly. 
... and there are also the lessons at the Microsoft site to consider.

.. and give yourself TIME to learn properly.

an analogy ; if you're learning Bask ( or any language), don't expect to  participate in semantic debates in a hurry.
Perfection is not optional.
Everything will work just as you expect it to, unless your expectations are incorrect.
Discipline: None at all.

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