Author Topic: .NET Help  (Read 14266 times)

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CmdrDuh

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2008, 05:01:52 PM »
I'm just, VERY much, a dive right in, get it done, work hard, get results.. kind of guy.
Ditto that, and it didn't work.  I ahd to learn about the basic things to get to the part where looking at Autocad code made sense.
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Josh Nieman

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2008, 05:07:03 PM »
I'm just, VERY much, a dive right in, get it done, work hard, get results.. kind of guy.
Ditto that, and it didn't work.  I ahd to learn about the basic things to get to the part where looking at Autocad code made sense.

That's what I'm finding out by reviewing some existing code snippets I'm finding on the net... this will be difficult, I think, and require a lot of patience, but I really think it will be an exciting result...

I know it may be a while before I can even begin developing this project I have an idea for, but I think it's worth it, because if I can accomplish it... the expansion of the limits of my customization/automation abilities would be quite exciting.

CmdrDuh

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2008, 05:14:02 PM »
thats the spirit!!  I read a couple of different books on C#, and went through the tutorials, which killed me b/c like you, I couldn't see why I was doing this when it doesn't apply.  Then one day, it just clicked, and it got a whole lot easier really fast!
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Glenn R

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2008, 05:15:34 PM »
I'm personally a huge fan of the Apress C# books..

Totally agree Q, with, as has been said, Mr Troelsen being one the best.
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Glenn R

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2008, 05:17:57 PM »
Then one day, it just clicked, and it got a whole lot easier really fast!

That's what I'm talking about. It will be a HUGE benefit (I'm speaking from experience here as are most others in relation to learning the constructs first) to you in the long run.
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Josh Nieman

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #20 on: March 05, 2008, 05:23:28 PM »
Thanks for the support, help, guidance, and opinions, guys.  I think I have everything available at my fingertips to succeed... now just to find time and apply myself properly.

Jeff_M

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2008, 06:24:31 PM »
Josh, for when you DO get started on your project..... check out the free source code Sinc has made available. Granted, most of it is for Civil3d.....but the small section he has for base Autocad stuff might be enough to give you a jump start, and it's even split out into it's own Project.

Kerry

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #22 on: March 06, 2008, 04:38:03 AM »
............... I like the O'Reilly books, and am currently enjoying C# 3.0, Fifth Ed.

I enjoyed the Fourth Edition ..

Currently using 11+ hours a week train travel to finish Troelsen's "Pro C# 2008 .."
at home, reading
"Pro Linq ... C#2008" by Joseph Rattz
and "Windows Forms in Action" by Erik Brown




« Last Edit: March 06, 2008, 02:57:21 PM by Kerry Brown »
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Glenn R

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2008, 04:43:58 AM »
I found Erik Brown's first edition (Programming Windows Forms in C#) excellent...what do you think of the second Kerry (Windows Forms in Action)?
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Glenn R

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2008, 04:47:19 AM »
As an aside, I just ordered from Amazon:

C# 3.0 Design Patterns
The Elements of C# Style
C# 3.0 Cookbook.

I received a couple of weeks ago:

Pro C# 2008 and the .NET 3.5 Platform
Pro LINQ (yet to start this one)

Has anybody bought any of Chris Sells' Windows Forms books and if so, what do you think?
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MP

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #25 on: March 06, 2008, 06:16:15 AM »
Skipping my 2.0 / VS 2005 books, or ones on order, I have ...

O'Reilly Press
C# 3.0 In A Nutshell, 3rd Ed. Albabara + Albabara
Programming C# 3.0, 5th Ed. Liberty + Xie
C# 3.0 Cookbook, 3rd Ed. Hilyard + Teilhet
Programming WPF, 2nd Ed. Sells + Griffiths

Apress
Pro C# 2008 ..., 4rth Ed. Troelsen.

Addidon Wesley
Effective C#, Bill Wagner*

Microsoft Press
Windows via C/C++. Richter + Nasarre

So to answer Glenn's question --

Has anybody bought any of Chris Sells' Windows Forms books and if so, what do you think?

I have his latest WPF book but I haven't read it yet. It's hefty for a O'Reilly book, though not a tome. Quickly glancing thru ... his writing style appears very conversational. Interesting note in the Preface, "Who this book is for" heading --

Quote from: Chriss Sells
... As much as I love the designers of the world who are going gaga over WPF,this book is aimed squarely at my people: developers. We're not teaching programming here, so having some sort of programming environment is a must before you read this book. Programming in .NET and C#is pretty much required; Windows Forms, XML and HTML all recommended ...

To me that suggests he's not going to waste his, or the reader's time talking about things said reader should already know, so I would guess the 800+ pages would cover a lot of ground, and at pace. I would think that would have far greater appeal to Glenn than a hand holding book that does review upon review of core material ad nauseum. But hey, it's been another challenging night for me, maybe playing interpreter should be left for those with all their marbles in one bag.

An aside, I believe the author made a mistake: environment should have likely been experience. A typo in the Preface? Is that a good sign?

Oh yeah, my name is Michael, I'm a bookaholic. Have been for as long as I can remember. I'll probably die with a book in my hand.

* Effective C# is a 2005 series book, but I just got it, so it crept into the list above.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2008, 06:21:31 AM by MP »
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Glenn R

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2008, 06:43:54 AM »
Thanks MP.

I think I will start investigating the O'Reilly books after being a long time fan of the APress books.

I just started into the intro chapters on WPF in Mr. Troelsens Pro C# 2008 and it struck me that XAML, in principle, is similar to DCL...a separate interface definition file...funny huh.

I also notice, that like me, you seem to focus your choice of books on WinForms and not ASP for instance. I have a long background in writing desktop apps so that is what I decided to concentrate on, not ASP internet/browser type apps. There comes a time, with the amount of information that is .NET, that you have to choose one aspect of it and learn that, otherwise it's a VERY big monster to try to learn everything and I don't think you could do that well.

I had a quick look at through the interface and Kean has a new entry detailing some of the API's in 2009 and I noticed that Adesk have used WPF for some of new interface implementations...

I think I will order Windows Forms 2.0 Programming and then his WPF book, but let me know what you think of it when you get to it.

Cheers,
Glenn.
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MP

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2008, 06:53:45 AM »
... you have to choose one aspect of it and learn that, otherwise it's a VERY big monster to try to learn everything and I don't think you could do that well ...

It's true, you have to decide to be a specialist or a generalist: The specialist learns more and more about less and less until he knows everything about nothing. The generalist knows less and less about more and more until he knows nothing about everything.

:-D

Go back to sleep Michael.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2008, 07:28:42 AM by MP »
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MP

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #28 on: March 06, 2008, 11:28:52 AM »
... it struck me that XAML, in principle, is similar to DCL...a separate interface definition file...funny huh.

Interesting observation Glenn. I wasn't too keen initially but after having read a bit by Charles Petzold on said topic I became quite intrigued. He's a bsaatrd that way, lol.

I also notice, that like me, you seem to focus your choice of books on WinForms and not ASP for instance.

I'm actually torn, because there are some cool things to done via the web, but I'm more inclined to do web stuff via python and related frameworks (after a brief foray into php).

I think I will order Windows Forms 2.0 Programming and then his WPF book, but let me know what you think of it when you get to it.

Will do; cheers.
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Glenn R

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Re: .NET Help
« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2008, 12:09:15 PM »
Well, the three books I mentioned above arrived today and I have already completed 'Elements of C# Style' and I would have to say it's one of the best programming books I've read.

It's only 150 odd pages, with 40 or so being a recap on rules and an index, but I would strongly suggest acquiring a copy if you're serious about C#. I found, that after reading it and reflecting upon my coding style, that I naturally did what most of the suggested rules said to do anyway, however it's nice to have what I tend to do automatically put into words/rules.

BTW, it's a pocket book in size - not as big (width, height) as your typical programming book - very easy to read in one sitting in a couple of hours.

Cheers,
Glenn.
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