Author Topic: The Jamaiican Project  (Read 14104 times)

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deegeecees

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #45 on: August 22, 2007, 07:48:43 PM »
[Frankfort, Illinois Pic1

Frankfort, Illinois Pic2

in short that is Ugly stuff....  :roll:

Yep.  Often times no one cares what it looks like ;)  Pretty cost money.

Two words:

Municipality Budgets

Keith™

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #46 on: August 22, 2007, 07:58:19 PM »
Keith/Josh

What killed the engineering for me on these was the lateral.  The ones I looked at had good columns at the corners but relied on that heavy gage corrugated siding for lateral restraint, and heavy gage corrugated siding just ain't in the code for shearwalls.  Also, as I recall, the corrugated sidewalls also have to provide for vertical shear in the vertical bending of the side walls from gravity loads.  I guess if that material was in the Steel Deck Design Manual it would work. 
Correct, but rather than rely upon a chart that tells me what the properties of a specific metal is, I can instead use the strength of the metal itself, which is readily available, provided you can determine the grade of the steel.

Applying lateral loads to corrigated (if the corrigation is vertical) is probably not a smart thing to do. You can however, use the calculation of a sheathing applied to both the interior and exterior of the structure to justify the shear values needed to comply with codes. With the roof and floor, obviously you would need to determine the attachment method, downloads, uplifts and lateral loads placed upon the structure. That isn't impossible to do, just so long as you have the proper values.

Incidently, way back in 1977, the US Army conducted engineering tests on a variety of shipping containers for use as mobile buildings, temporary housing, along with other unique uses. They issued a report that the shipping containers as a structure exceed all structural requirements, including the heaviest snow loads, and could be placed anywhere in the world without adverse effect.

I know codes change and we learn more ... but there are many engineering and architectural firms now using containers as housing.

As far as insulation is concerned, I was reading where some company has developed an R90 insulation that fits in 4 inches. I can imagine that it isn't cheap though.
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Josh Nieman

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #47 on: August 22, 2007, 08:20:21 PM »
R90 in 4" ?  Wowzers...

After reading your reply Keith, I think I may just make it a point to sit down and mention it to the boss.  This could be something new and different to our area (I've not seen one anywhere around here yet) that would be well received and maybe get our name around a bit more.  Something tells me that if this'd be successful anywhere, it'd be in hurricane areas that would like to see good solid metal building structure, cheap to replace in case something DOES happen, and git-r-done, don't make 'er pretty type settings.  A lot of people around here fit that bill to a Tee, including some of our clients.

deegeecees

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #48 on: August 23, 2007, 10:52:34 AM »
Well, after a few beers and a blues band, I finally managed to nail down an estimate budget number. Looks like it's gonna be sticks and leaves for construction materials, and a 1 by for plumbing. We'll tie into existing neighboring electrical via extension chord, and insulate using a tarp.

deegeecees

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #49 on: August 23, 2007, 10:54:24 AM »
I spelled Jamaican wrong, didn't I.

Josh Nieman

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #50 on: August 23, 2007, 11:01:31 AM »
Well, after a few beers and a blues band, I finally managed to nail down an estimate budget number. Looks like it's gonna be sticks and leaves for construction materials, and a 1 by for plumbing. We'll tie into existing neighboring electrical via extension chord, and insulate using a tarp.

 :lmao:

Maverick®

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #51 on: August 23, 2007, 12:31:03 PM »
Well, after a few beers and a blues band, I finally managed to nail down an estimate budget number. Looks like it's gonna be sticks and leaves for construction materials, and a 1 by for plumbing. We'll tie into existing neighboring electrical via extension chord, and insulate using a tarp.

See what his schedule is like.  If he waits a few years he can go around after hurricanes and pick up materials to re-use.

*Johnny Cash*  "I got it one piece at a time... and it didn't cost me a dime.... you'll know it's me when I come through your town....."

deegeecees

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #52 on: August 23, 2007, 01:13:18 PM »
Actually I was joking. Hehe. Client was very receptive to the container home idea, and we'll be designing in that direction. Target date for site preparation will be late Nov.

I'm keeping in mind the Fung Shuei (sp) -iness, and all the ergonomical impact, as well as the surrounding natural beauty. Containers as residential structures have an Art-Deco feel to them by themselves, so I'm going to use 4 containers as an "inner shell", and surround them with entities that will blend in to the scenery. This way, there'll be an inner sanctuary for inclement weather and an outer facade that serves as an extension of the dwelling. This is my intent, we'll see where it ends up.

Josh Nieman

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #53 on: August 23, 2007, 01:16:36 PM »
Actually I was joking. Hehe. Client was very receptive to the container home idea, and we'll be designing in that direction. Target date for site preparation will be late Nov.

I'm keeping in mind the Fung Shuei (sp) -iness, and all the ergonomical impact, as well as the surrounding natural beauty. Containers as residential structures have an Art-Deco feel to them by themselves, so I'm going to use 4 containers as an "inner shell", and surround them with entities that will blend in to the scenery. This way, there'll be an inner sanctuary for inclement weather and an outer facade that serves as an extension of the dwelling. This is my intent, we'll see where it ends up.

I don't know how much you are at liberty to share, regarding the project, but I'd be much interesting seeing this project develop.  I'm very interested in this container construction idea, and what some people have done with it.

deegeecees

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #54 on: August 23, 2007, 01:20:37 PM »
I'll share what I can Josh.

 :-)

CottageCGirl

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #55 on: August 23, 2007, 02:32:57 PM »
http://www.deltechomes.com/hurricaneproof.php?PHPSESSID=34c64f335a1408c029dabb1e67ad8e16

I know this is not metal construction...but we looked at them when we were building..and almost did one...we didn't because our building site wanted a more linear plan.....

I am not sure about Jamaica, but in the US Virgins ( and on Block Island as well) there is an unwritten code.....
Be sure to use local contractors where you can ,due to the small islandeconomy, if you don't....you may not be able to get anyone to work on your property after it is built...gardeners...plumbers....housecleaners etc....you kind of get black listed...so it would be important to find this out ahead of time from the locals....

The summer I spent out on Block Island, there was a completed condo complex that sat empty because they had used exclusively off island contractors and the realators, taxi's etc would not even go on the property....
\\\\\\\"Why is there never enought time to do it right, BUT Always enough time to do it over?///////"

Maverick®

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #56 on: August 23, 2007, 02:39:47 PM »
Good info. CG!

deegeecees

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #57 on: August 23, 2007, 02:52:29 PM »
We've got time to consider other options, although very fitting for the situation, this looks like it may be a bit beyond what client is willing to spend. I'm involved in this only as a friend with drafting/design experience, and am trying to save the client as much money as possible. Given the available resources at my disposal (i.e. metal fabrication), I'm attempting to use cheap materials creatively. That is very cool though, thanks for the link.

 :-)

CottageCGirl

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #58 on: August 23, 2007, 02:59:00 PM »
We've got time to consider other options, although very fitting for the situation, this looks like it may be a bit beyond what client is willing to spend. I'm involved in this only as a friend with drafting/design experience, and am trying to save the client as much money as possible. Given the available resources at my disposal (i.e. metal fabrication), I'm attempting to use cheap materials creatively. That is very cool though, thanks for the link.

 :-)

I found a ton of metal pre-fab out of Australlia and New Zeland --very cool and inexpensive... it didn't make sense with shipping to the US, but since you will probably be shipping from at least the US, you might search there...that was 4 years ago, but I bet they have only gotten better....
\\\\\\\"Why is there never enought time to do it right, BUT Always enough time to do it over?///////"

deegeecees

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Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #59 on: August 23, 2007, 03:51:04 PM »
We have resources for the materials I "intend" to use all over the world, so shipping is not a concern (at the moment). Very much appreciated, though.