Author Topic: The Jamaiican Project  (Read 15161 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

LE

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #30 on: August 22, 2007, 04:39:02 PM »
... I just want to buy and sell dirt . . ..

I am starting that as we speak, already have one property, have an offer on another, have eyes on at least 4 others, and have been contemplating placing an offer on at least 3 others. Soon, I will have a slum empire BUWAHAHAHAHAHAHA

I seriously wish you all the luck - :)

Keith™

  • Villiage Idiot
  • Seagull
  • Posts: 16723
  • Superior Stupidity at its best
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #31 on: August 22, 2007, 04:44:27 PM »
Thanks Luis
Proud provider of opinion and arrogance since November 22, 2003 at 09:35:31 am
CadJockey Militia Field Marshal

Bob Garner

  • Gator
  • Posts: 2902
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #32 on: August 22, 2007, 04:45:28 PM »
How do you "do" the engineering on those shipping containers.  The last time I researched those things, they are pretty much performance built based on the testing of prototypes.  We know they're strong 'cuz we see them stacked way high on ships exposed to ocean storms.  But how do you convince a building department.

I once had a "niche" market providing designs for standardized peaked roofs to make these things look presentable, and also had some package details for window and door openings with flashings and all.  But the owner had to get permits.  They were never able to get permits and my niche market tanked.

Bob

Keith™

  • Villiage Idiot
  • Seagull
  • Posts: 16723
  • Superior Stupidity at its best
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #33 on: August 22, 2007, 04:47:57 PM »
Bob, the engineering on steel is sound, you just have to calculate it.
Proud provider of opinion and arrogance since November 22, 2003 at 09:35:31 am
CadJockey Militia Field Marshal

Josh Nieman

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #34 on: August 22, 2007, 04:59:54 PM »
Bob, the engineering on steel is sound, you just have to calculate it.

I actually sent some of those links on to the bosses, and think I'll bring it up with them to see what they think of the idea.  I think there could be potential, but would have to be examined by someone more engineeringly gifted than me.  I am thinking of it as being used for the incidental office space for a lot of commercial projects we do for machine shops, warehouses, and random other manufacturing facilities that can have 10ksq ft+ of work area, then 5-10% of that have to have a wood or metal studded office area, sometimes two stories, within the metal building shell.  This could be an economical solution for some of our clients who want it cheap, long-lasting, and done right, and don't give two hoots if it's pretty or not.

The hurdle I see is getting a contractor to welcome the idea of working with the stuff, and striking up some economical supply connections, as well as overcoming the initial engineering hurdle.

Bob Garner

  • Gator
  • Posts: 2902
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #35 on: August 22, 2007, 05:10:12 PM »
Keith/Josh

What killed the engineering for me on these was the lateral.  The ones I looked at had good columns at the corners but relied on that heavy gage corrugated siding for lateral restraint, and heavy gage corrugated siding just ain't in the code for shearwalls.  Also, as I recall, the corrugated sidewalls also have to provide for vertical shear in the vertical bending of the side walls from gravity loads.  I guess if that material was in the Steel Deck Design Manual it would work. 

How do you do it?

Bob

Josh Nieman

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #36 on: August 22, 2007, 05:14:34 PM »
Keith/Josh

What killed the engineering for me on these was the lateral.  The ones I looked at had good columns at the corners but relied on that heavy gage corrugated siding for lateral restraint, and heavy gage corrugated siding just ain't in the code for shearwalls.  Also, as I recall, the corrugated sidewalls also have to provide for vertical shear in the vertical bending of the side walls from gravity loads.  I guess if that material was in the Steel Deck Design Manual it would work. 

How do you do it?

Bob

Un/Fortunately for me I'm simply an aspiring designer in a CAD Tech's shoes, and this stuff is beyond me.  If the boss man has any interesting input on the nature of them, I'll pass on his opinion.  I'm probably going to get a reply something to the effect of "if it ain't broke don't fix it" as well as something about not worth learning something new, while stating something uplifting to me about having a good idea and that it's good to keep an eye out for trends and changes.

I think he musta read a self-help book on managing a while back and memorized it well.

deegeecees

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #37 on: August 22, 2007, 06:05:14 PM »
*^^^*
I am happy that I will be doing Architecture for only 5-8 years more.... with all of that prefab stuff.... and legoland pseudo architecture among many other things - it will make and or making this profession extint.... :)

We had the opportunity to build a cabana in Colorado in a 28 acres land.... the client want it to bring/built from a prefab-house - but glad that they change their mind and it is going to be a custom house instead....

We haven't ruled anything out yet Luis, I was impressed with these Container Homes as Josh was. I'd use these as examples of what could be done. I just don't know the budget as of yet. For all I know the thing might be made out of sticks and leaves.

deegeecees

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #38 on: August 22, 2007, 06:06:20 PM »
BTW, Redi-rock is a retaining wall structure so something like that isn't exactly made for housing... those blocks would be battered inward for one.  Although that could be a benefit if sold properly ;)

Ooops. Hadn't researched that one yet.

deegeecees

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #39 on: August 22, 2007, 06:33:32 PM »
How do you "do" the engineering on those shipping containers.  The last time I researched those things, they are pretty much performance built based on the testing of prototypes.  We know they're strong 'cuz we see them stacked way high on ships exposed to ocean storms.  But how do you convince a building department.

...

This was built to NON residential specs, applying the magic of steel reinforcement.

Frankfort, Illinois Pic1

Frankfort, Illinois Pic2

The centroid of these things lies in the casters, if you leave all outer structural members in place, and brace where caster meets crossmember, you can design a stacked element.



Josh Nieman

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #40 on: August 22, 2007, 06:45:11 PM »
How do you "do" the engineering on those shipping containers.  The last time I researched those things, they are pretty much performance built based on the testing of prototypes.  We know they're strong 'cuz we see them stacked way high on ships exposed to ocean storms.  But how do you convince a building department.

...

This was built to NON residential specs, applying the magic of steel reinforcement.

Frankfort, Illinois Pic1

Frankfort, Illinois Pic2

The centroid of these things lies in the casters, if you leave all outer structural members in place, and brace where caster meets crossmember, you can design a stacked element.


I think fought a battle there when I was playing Delta Force; Blackhawk Down.

deegeecees

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #41 on: August 22, 2007, 06:50:24 PM »
I think fought a battle there when I was playing Delta Force; Blackhawk Down.

It is a "Tactical Training Facility", so hopefully I've made a difference and saved a life or two. It'd be pretty cool to use it in Rasterwerks.

 :-)

Josh Nieman

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #42 on: August 22, 2007, 07:00:05 PM »
I think fought a battle there when I was playing Delta Force; Blackhawk Down.

It is a "Tactical Training Facility", so hopefully I've made a difference and saved a life or two. It'd be pretty cool to use it in Rasterwerks.

 :-)

haha yea, that'd be something.  Delta Force had the ability to create custom maps, and one of the objects available for use were shipping containers, with doors open or closed... some of the lazier people would build whole intricate structures out of closed up containers, like legos, even stacking some at an angle to make ramp-like stairways to get up to the top of towers made of nothing but hundreds of stacked containers.

That's a pretty cool facility, and a good example of where it would be a sound practice to recycle and reuse something like that.

How much work was needed for reinforcing those things?

The first reply I got from one of the engineers was "The R-value on those things must be next to $#!+" which would be another concern for only habitable applications.

LE

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #43 on: August 22, 2007, 07:03:08 PM »

Josh Nieman

  • Guest
Re: The Jamaiican Project
« Reply #44 on: August 22, 2007, 07:06:16 PM »
[Frankfort, Illinois Pic1

Frankfort, Illinois Pic2

in short that is Ugly stuff....  :roll:

Yep.  Often times no one cares what it looks like ;)  Pretty cost money.