Author Topic: Locking a layer  (Read 5684 times)

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Josh Nieman

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2007, 04:01:13 PM »
I do however use "multi-drawings" extensively.



As well as Reddy whip.

WHIP IT!

Krushert

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #31 on: October 23, 2007, 05:17:26 PM »
I do however use "multi-drawings" extensively.



As well as Reddy whip.

WHIP IT!
WHIP IT GOOD!
I + XI = X is true ...  ... if you change your perspective.

I no longer CAD or Model, I just hang out here picking up the empties beer cans

daron

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2007, 06:27:35 PM »
Craigr, do you use any blocks? If not, xref's aren't the way to go. If you draw everything on layer 0, I'm guessing you work in a production type shop. When i worked for a glass and door installer, I needed no blocks or layers or anything but lines and soickles. However, I did set up templates and automated everything I could with Python, since I too was using AutosuckLT, I couldn't automate that.

As for The code that Bob posted, I haven't tested it, but it sure looks like you wouldn't be even able to put viewports on the layer in question, since you can't even set the layer current. You probably could select the object and then set it to the layer, but not set the layer, then draw the appropriate objects.

Josh Nieman

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2007, 06:35:36 PM »
This is just a thought out of the blue... but...


Are you looking to restrict ANYTHING from being drawn on CERTAIN layers, or would it be helpful to simply make sure CERTAIN items are drawn on a SPECIFIC layer?

If the second situation is your case, then you could probably redefine the button's macro to set a layer current.  LT does macros right?  You can use the CUI as much as in the full blown Autocad right?  I'm not sure but I think I remember LT people being big on macros.

Say you want to make sure all VIEWPORTS go on a VPORT layer... you could probably put something like
Code: [Select]
^C^C-LAYER;S;VPORTS;^C-VPORTS;P;
That'll set the current layer to a layer named "VPORTS" and then initiate the command line version of the VPORTS command, and pick "Polygonal" for the defining method.  So basically clicking a button with that macro will set your layer, then start the VPORTS command up until you have to pick points for the polygonal viewport.  Obviously you can alter what command you wish to use for the viewport and such.



...ok after going and rereading this topic, I just realized I got totally confused as to who had the problem, what program they were using and ... ooohh a butterfly

(don't mind me)
« Last Edit: October 23, 2007, 06:38:02 PM by Josh Nieman »

Bob Wahr

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #34 on: October 23, 2007, 06:45:42 PM »

As for The code that Bob posted, I haven't tested it, but it sure looks like you wouldn't be even able to put viewports on the layer in question, since you can't even set the layer current. You probably could select the object and then set it to the layer, but not set the layer, then draw the appropriate objects.
That was pretty much what I was going for.  In my mind it seemed the best solution.  Still possible to get things where they need to be, much harder to accidentally get things where they needn't.

Krushert

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #35 on: October 23, 2007, 06:51:49 PM »
(don't mind me)
I don't but you should real ask the other Josh.  He might.
I + XI = X is true ...  ... if you change your perspective.

I no longer CAD or Model, I just hang out here picking up the empties beer cans

Bob Wahr

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #36 on: October 23, 2007, 06:56:13 PM »
Speaking of other Joshes, has anyone heard anything from Josh West lately?  I heard from him a couple of times after he left CAD for politics but that was what 3-4 years ago.

sinc

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #37 on: October 23, 2007, 07:16:36 PM »
I don't xref either.

I have, and yes, even inhaled.

You inhaled an XREF?  Without causing a fatal error?   :lol:

jonesy

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #38 on: October 24, 2007, 03:37:46 AM »
Josh, The viewports ARE on the viewport layer. It just seems that when they have drawn the viewports they carry on using it until they realise...

Makes me wonder how much other stuff is on the wrong layers :(
Thanks for explaining the word "many" to me, it means a lot.

jonesy

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #39 on: October 24, 2007, 03:40:34 AM »

As for The code that Bob posted, I haven't tested it, but it sure looks like you wouldn't be even able to put viewports on the layer in question, since you can't even set the layer current. You probably could select the object and then set it to the layer, but not set the layer, then draw the appropriate objects.
That was pretty much what I was going for.  In my mind it seemed the best solution.  Still possible to get things where they need to be, much harder to accidentally get things where they needn't.
On thinking things through, would it be better to put an "alert" box to warn people that they are about to draw on a restricted layer?
Thanks for explaining the word "many" to me, it means a lot.

craigr

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Re: Locking a layer
« Reply #40 on: October 24, 2007, 08:22:13 AM »
Daron,

We DO use blocks, rather heavily. We are an HVAC Automation company that also installs Commercial Security.

So, we have two different types of dwgs with different standards for each - it had to be that way.

For our HVAC, most of our dwgs are line type dwgs of Air Handlers & etc.. Most of these dwgs are made from many blocks - most of which are brought into the dwg with macros. The HVAC dwgs also have 'panel details', which are a representation of how to wire the different devices to our DDC Controllers. Along with these are Panel points lists, Sequence of Operations & Wiring details - No real need for different layers.

For our Security side, our dwgs are usually floor plans from other companies that we strip out all of the plumbing, HVAC, Electrical, etc.. so that all we have are doors, walls and such. We then place these on a layer called 'floorplan'. We then try to purge out as many layers as we can, so we are left with only our layers.
We don't get updated floor plans very often, but when we do, I just lock / freeze all layers but 'floorplan' then replace the old floor plan with the new one.

I tried using XRefs for the floor plans, on a couple of jobs, but found it was more trouble than it was worth for us. Admittedly, we are used to doing it our way and didn't want to spend a bunch of time restructuring our filepaths & teaching the others how to do it. - Our way works fine for us. (Until I am convinced otherwise).

craigr