Author Topic: Revit learning curve?  (Read 291 times)

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craigr

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Revit learning curve?
« on: May 18, 2017, 01:42:53 pm »
I have used AutoCAD LT for 20ish years and have customized it heavily to fit my kind of projects.

I am now looking for new employment. A recruiter asked me if I knew Revit, which I don't. So, I have a couple questions for you folks....

What is the learning curve going from AutoCAD to Revit? Will I be able to just walk right into it?

Can Revit be customized like AutoCAD?
Self Taught and Still Learning!
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lamarn

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Re: Revit learning curve?
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2017, 12:26:44 am »
I wouldn't dare to compare it, especially not 2d lt.
If you are familiar with some 3d operations and parametric behaviour you will catch up quickly.
Customizing like the way you want it to work is a big NO! USER should adapt to the way Revit works best.

Personally i found the amount different used methods and the lack of rhyrarchy in parts and pieces to big to be really more productive than autocad. But that also caused because i work with revit for civil, not for buildings. Its not fit for other thing than buildings in my opinion.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 12:32:53 am by lamarn »
Design is something you should do with both hands. My 2d hand , my 3d hand ..

alterego

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Re: Revit learning curve?
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2017, 03:01:41 am »
If this is the path you want to follow I suggest getting yourself on a training course, and also look at the many videos available online, but it would still be a learning curve when you start putting those training modules into real life situations. 

I came from an AutoCAD & Microstation background so for some reason I didn't find it as daunting as my colleagues who had only used AutoCAD.  Also I think it depends on what discipline of Revit you are looking into as to how quick you can transition. In a previous role I modelled in Revit Structures and found it very basic and easy compared to the MEP I use now.

craigr

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Re: Revit learning curve?
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2017, 05:28:38 pm »
Thanks for the replies.

Can one write scripts & Lisps type customizations in Revit?
Self Taught and Still Learning!
Win7 Pro, AutCad LT  2013. Intel Xeon 8 Core 3.40GHz Processor, 8 Gig Ram, 3 LCD Monitors

Matt__W

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Re: Revit learning curve?
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2017, 04:14:00 pm »
Forget everything you've ever learned about AutoCAD when trying to learn Revit. It's like comparing apples to..... whatever the most opposite thing to an apple is.  :-D
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Rob...

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Re: Revit learning curve?
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2017, 04:54:17 pm »
@Matt, I had a lot of trouble with that statement when I started using Revit. Mostly because of all that I put into learning AutoCAD. It's so ingrained in my mind that it is present in many unrelated aspects of my life. So much so, that I dream CAD, but I digress. That statement should read something more like "put it aside for a while" instead of "forget it". Forgetting it would be a daunting task.

Also, it's only valid for getting over the hump as you get used to Revit. Despite the differences, as a beginner gets over the hump and digs into Revit, they will find similarities. I've actually been able to use a person's knowledge of AutoCAD to help them learn some things in Revit.
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Bobby C. Jones

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Re: Revit learning curve?
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2017, 05:23:13 pm »
What is the learning curve going from AutoCAD to Revit? Will I be able to just walk right into it?

No, it's a steep curve.  There are too many variables to say how long it will take you to overcome that curve, but I told management to give our team members 6 months to become fully proficient.

Can Revit be customized like AutoCAD?
I suppose that depends on your definition of customization.  Revit does not have a way without writing code to create a custom menu (it doesn't have a menu, just a ribbon, a QAT, and some floating palettes anyway).  It does have a simple GUI for assigning custom keyboard shortcuts, or by editing XML if you're into that sort of thing.  And the amount of customization available via view templates, filters, parameters, families, and standard Revit processes is extensive.

Since you're coming from acad lt then I don't think writing code is what you mean by customization, but if it is, then there are two main options with Revit.  The first is Dynamo, which I have exactly 0 experience with, but is nonetheless what I would suggest you to start with.  There's even a Swamp forum for it.  Then there's the Revit .NET API.
 
Bobby C. Jones

tedg

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Re: Revit learning curve?
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2017, 08:20:19 am »
My 2 cents..
As others have hinted, it's very different than AutoCAD.
You should get formal training, just the "Essentials" helps you on your way.
Youtube, tutorials, etc.


You'll find early on, saying to yourself things like: "I just want to <insert something you would do in ACAD>, why can't I just change it?"
Mostly for the way you want to see / print stuff, but other reasons too.
That's why it's best to have templates in place so you don't have to frig with it later.


Working within the disciplines is a bit different between each other, Arch and Struct are closely related but M/E/P (piping and systems) is a bit more complicated (in my opinion).
It depends on what you do for work. I do mostly Structural, a little Architectural, but link MEP models and control visibility, I rarely, if ever "work" in Revit MEP.


Working on actual projects helps a lot, you're always finding better ways to do things, especially if there's a lead or power-user setting stuff up.
But you need to start somewhere.


Good luck.





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