Author Topic: Revit VS ADT  (Read 10538 times)

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Draftek

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Re: Revit VS ADT
« Reply #30 on: June 30, 2006, 12:13:52 pm »
The Billion Dollar Question for Autodesk is do they want to allow AutoCAD to generate components based off of Database information. To me that makes sense, I'm just not sure if it will to Autodesk...

I do this every day, just not from Revit created data. Yet....
Soli Deo Gloria

Dilbert

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Re: Revit VS ADT
« Reply #31 on: June 30, 2006, 12:23:32 pm »
The Billion Dollar Question for Autodesk is do they want to allow AutoCAD to generate components based off of Database information. To me that makes sense, I'm just not sure if it will to Autodesk...

I do this every day, just not from Revit created data. Yet....

Its off topic, but it could relate back into the discussion, what process do you use?

CADaver

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Re: Revit VS ADT
« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2006, 12:44:36 pm »
We'll need to agree to dis-agree on some things since only time will tell.
You're the new guy at the Swamp so I'll be nice for a change and let that slide. :wink:

which means we likely will never have a program that can do it all for everyone because not everyone needs all those capabilities.
That's odd, I use one every day.  It's just not Revit (nor ADT for that matter).

The question as posed here may actually be wrong. I don't believe ADT will ever become a true BIM product because its still just objects regardless of how its cleaned up.
Can't speak for ADT, but it's not the objects,but the data that can be extracted from the objects and what can be done with that data

But, if AUTOCAD can begin to understand BIM information then we have an entirely new ballgame with a huge potential for a Revit/ADT merge.  AutoCAD would at that point potentially become interoperable with both Revit and Inventor and the program could be customized to their users hearts content.
And there is the key.

The Billion Dollar Question for Autodesk is do they want to allow AutoCAD to generate components based off of Database information. To me that makes sense, I'm just not sure if it will to Autodesk...
Certainly a connection between the database and components makes sense to Autodesk, or there wouldn't be a Revit in their stable.  What we're seeing now are the seeds of the eventual hybrid 5 -10 years from now (which will be the seeds of the eventual hybrid 5 - 10 years from then)

Dilbert

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Re: Revit VS ADT
« Reply #33 on: June 30, 2006, 01:31:52 pm »
This I will argue about, you do use a program everyday that will do it all in AutoCAD, but it doesn't do it as well as ADT can... or Inventor... or Revit...  or ArchiCAD... or Solidworks or...

Yes, it can do a wide variety of things better than anything, but it can't do specific tasks better than most task related programs. No matter how much you customize AutoCAD (unless you use a 3rd party program), I'll likely finish a project first with a highly customized version of ADT in drawing a building.

That's not a knock against AutoCAD, its versatility has long been its greatest strength! Yet when it comes to aiding in structural calculations, heat loss totals, mechanical engineering... it simply does not currently have the data required to speed these processes along like the "BIM" solutions.

So I'll agree with you, if Autodesk ever enables AutoCAD to do this then no one will question its worth...and Revit and ADT would be much more likely to team up. If it doesn't, then I can't see them ever merging.

Thanks for letting my comment in the previous post slide!    :roll: 
I think we basically agree!

Dilbert

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Re: Revit VS ADT
« Reply #34 on: June 30, 2006, 01:40:38 pm »
Can't speak for ADT, but it's not the objects,but the data that can be extracted from the objects and what can be done with that data

I wanted to add this since it relates:  The issue with ADT objects is that they can be created with very little data at all. It could just be a solid with a size and shape to be a door. On the other hand, in Revit it's a metal door with many more real world properties.  It's the difference between being a model of a door and actually being a door.  To do the calcs needed it really needs all that extra information, and Revit organizes, requires, and uses that data much better. Also, it bases the representation of objects on that data, in ADT its really just attached to something... it may or may not look like the attached data or change as the data is changed. I do believe ADT COULD do this if they invested the resources into it, but it doesn't look like that's what they want to do.  So that leads back to AutoCAD being able to do it.

CADaver

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Re: Revit VS ADT
« Reply #35 on: June 30, 2006, 04:03:28 pm »
This I will argue about, you do use a program everyday that will do it all in AutoCAD, but it doesn't do it as well as ADT can... or Inventor... or Revit...  or ArchiCAD... or Solidworks or...
Actually it does the things we need to do better than those programs

Yes, it can do a wide variety of things better than anything, but it can't do specific tasks better than most task related programs.
If a task specific tool is only capable of that specific task then it is useless for the myriad of other tasks that must be done as regularly as the specific task

No matter how much you customize AutoCAD (unless you use a 3rd party program),
or have essentially built your own, as we have.

Yet when it comes to aiding in structural calculations, heat loss totals, mechanical engineering... it simply does not currently have the data required to speed these processes along like the "BIM" solutions.
"like" the BIM solutions, no.  Differently from the other BIM solutions, yes.  We've been bouncing back and forth between DWG files and structural analysis programs for well over a decade using our version of plain AutoCAD.

So I'll agree with you, if Autodesk ever enables AutoCAD to do this then no one will question its worth...and Revit and ADT would be much more likely to team up. If it doesn't, then I can't see them ever merging.
The only way it won't happen is if Autodesk determines to let AutoCAD stagnate in favor of other solutions, and I see little eveidence for that.  Looking at the improvements of data embeddment and retrieval over the last dozen years I have little reason to doubt the same or more improvements in the next dozen.

I think we basically agree!
sorta.