Author Topic: Get the position in the list  (Read 2542 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

xiaxiang

  • Guest
Re: Get the position in the list
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2013, 09:15:47 AM »
thanks for sharing gile!
How could I use these F# code in CAD environment?
Maybe it is the same as C#.
Xia

gile

  • Water Moccasin
  • Posts: 2283
  • Marseille, France
Re: Get the position in the list
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2013, 03:22:02 PM »
Yes, F# is a .NET language as VB or C# but it requires some specific libraries called "F# runtime" which aren't part of the NAT framework to be installed.

There's no free F# Express edition of Visual studio, but you can you can also install the VS2010 integrated shell (free download). Then install the CTP MSI, for a free VS2010 version of F# 2.0.

You can also try F# without installing anything with Try F#
Speaking English as a French Frog

irneb

  • Water Moccasin
  • Posts: 1794
  • ACad R9-2016, Revit Arch 6-2016
Re: Get the position in the list
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2013, 01:48:41 AM »
Actually a bit surprised ... I thought F# was a "new" language invented by someone from Microsoft (or rather some of what I've read lead me to believe such). While looking for some DotNet Lisp-based languages I came across this page, which seems to indicate that F# is actually a form of Caml.
Common sense - the curse in disguise. Because if you have it, you have to live with those that don't.

gile

  • Water Moccasin
  • Posts: 2283
  • Marseille, France
Re: Get the position in the list
« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2013, 01:28:39 PM »
Extract from "Expert F#" by Don Syme, Adam Granizc and Antonio Cisternino (from Microsoft Research which provides the language design) Apress editor:
Quote
F# shares a core language with the programming language OCaml, and in some ways it can be considered an "OCaml for .NET". F# would not exist without OCaml, which in turn comes from the ML family of programming languages which dates back to 1974, F# also draws from haskell particulary with regard to two advanced features called sequence expressions and workflows. [...]
Despite the similariries to OCaml and Haskell, programming with F# is really quite different, in particular, the F# approach to type inference, OO programming, and dynamic language techniques is substantially different from all other mainstream functional languages.

Also in Wikipedia:
Quote
F# originated as a variant of ML and has been influenced by OCaml, C#, Python, Haskell, Scala and Erlang.
Speaking English as a French Frog