Author Topic: Question for the Architectural guys (residential side)  (Read 4015 times)

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StykFacE

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Question for the Architectural guys (residential side)
« on: August 23, 2010, 04:22:02 pm »
Gots uh question to acts. (<-- joke)

Anyways.... quick question. On the PDF that's attached, I'm doing a little modifications for a friend of mine who is using this plan to have a home built. He needs me to recreate this Roof Framing plan but basically I'm taking a few feet off the rear. Anyways, notice around the perimeter of the roof, you see the framing joist and rafters which a number displayed with a feet symbol next to it. I'm trying to figure out what this dimension is representing. This drawing is to scale, and I can't seem to compare the dimensional number to any reference of each joist/rafter. Can anyone explain what these dimensions relate to? Thanks in advance.  ;-)

mjfarrell

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Re: Question for the Architectural guys (residential side)
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2010, 04:28:09 pm »
not an architect....

however it looks like they could be the length of the top or bottom chord of the joist....
OR distance to a bearing wall.

what does your scale tell you now?  Being a civil guy we never scale architectural plans.   ;-)

also notice NOTES in lower corner RE: quality of the wood to be used for various lengths.....me thinks they are trying to give the framers a clue as to what wood quality goes where to help order the correct lumber for the job.
Be your Best


Michael Farrell
http://primeservicesglobal.com/

Maverick

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Re: Question for the Architectural guys (residential side)
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2010, 04:49:43 pm »
Can't say as I've seen it done that way but I would say that it is for material takeoff.  Notice the dimension in the corners covers 2 or 3 rafters together.  Also the Hips are called out as 2x10 and then the length in a similar way.

Normally on something like that you would see similar numbers where the rafters meet @ the hip, this plan doesn't work that way as it looks like it is a dual pitch roof.  (one pitch front to back, another left to right)

They jump up in dimension b/c they are using dimensional lumber.  The slightest amount over a 2' increment will push it to the next increment.

HTH


Maverick

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Re: Question for the Architectural guys (residential side)
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2010, 05:15:10 pm »
Also... the plan is 10 yrs old.  I hope someone local has checked to see if Spans/holdowns/etc. are still within code.  Could be different down south but I haven't seen a handframed complete roof in many, many years.

StykFacE

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Re: Question for the Architectural guys (residential side)
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2010, 06:04:29 pm »
Thanks for the help guys. Once I make the changes I'll upload them to see what you guys think. I'm just going to go with what I think is right and get a review and comment from here (hopefully).  :kewl:

Bob Wahr

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Re: Question for the Architectural guys (residential side)
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2010, 06:22:17 pm »
Looks great.  Submit it to the city, they'll plan check it for you.

mjfarrell

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Re: Question for the Architectural guys (residential side)
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2010, 09:57:04 pm »
Looks great.  Submit it to the city, they'll plan check it for you.
Great plan; other than the fact that they assume no liability for anything that they do approve.
Speaking from the experience of having had 'approved plans' constructed only to fail inspection in the field and paying for it to be redone.
Be your Best


Michael Farrell
http://primeservicesglobal.com/