Author Topic: Time Frame  (Read 2237 times)

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Artisan

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Time Frame
« on: November 12, 2004, 07:46:50 AM »
Good morning. I have began the process of compiling a group of standards together for my new place of employment. Currently, they have no standards, no methods, nothing in place. So my process will start with nothing and create everything down to how objects are saved, plotted, so on.... My question, which is being asked to me as well, is how long could one expect to spend on getting these standards together? During this time, I am also doing working drawings for some new projects as well as trying to come up with a new prototype for our department. I have also been placed with the task of creating a block library of details, which must be created from scratch. I have compiled a list of layers that would suit our needs, but nothing has been decided on by my boss. I have define some perimeters that the prototype will abide by and also designated some font types. Also, factor into that time number that I am using ADT 3.3 for the first time every and I am responsible for wall, window, door and other creations to be in place for use. In about a week, we will be upgrading to 2005 w/ADT, so I guess pile that in as well. I was just looking for a number to shoot for. Thanks

M-dub

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Time Frame
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2004, 08:03:29 AM »
If you're working on CAD work as well, I would give yourself roughly a month to three months...It's hard to say.  I suppose it depends on how in depth you want your standards to be.  As far as blocks are concerned, have you looked at Blockwerx?

daron

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Time Frame
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2004, 08:34:38 AM »
Whatever you decide, my personal opinionated advice: "Keep it flexible". Allow your co-irker some breathing room. Let them work how they work best. Also, it wouldn't be a bad idea to set up tips-n-tricks emails that you could write yourself or get from BB's such as this and lunch and learn training on topics such as dll's for toolbars and programming. BTW, there is a fledgling <sp> "program?" being worked on, on this board where you could have teacher/student situations. Give everybody the chance to learn. Who knows, you may find someone you work with who has great interest in programming. Let 'im learn it and use it to your advantage.

M-dub

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Time Frame
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2004, 08:40:00 AM »
Keeping it flexible is definitely a good idea, but don't be TOO flexible.  I mean, if you give people enough freedom to 'CAD at will', you might end up with undesirable results.
Just remember one thing when it comes to creating standards; Common sense isn't really common at all!

daron

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Time Frame
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2004, 08:55:58 AM »
Very true. Let me go further to explain. Many companies take the stand of standards to the extreme (IMO). My IT boss, for instance, has "standards" so locked down (or so they think) that they don't even let you have a jpg of your family set on the desktop. What a joke. Anyway, they try and try to say that their "standards" should be adhered to and they even have an average cad guy in charge of the IT side of cad. I've noticed that even though they say no deviating from the "standards", including how the toolbars and menu's are setup, that nobody has the same setup. The first thing everybody does when they start here, is move toolbars around and create ones they're used to using. Also, nobody thinks about upgrades. Everybody modifies the acad.mns file "unknowingly". Anywho, guess what else? Most people here use LT. There are a few of us who full cad. They don't have express tools for 2002. Good thing they're upgrading to 2005ADT. Don't get me started on my opinion for this company using ADT wilst everybody else uses LT. Flop. Anyway, I need to cut this off. Can you see where I'm heading with this? Don't be a cadNazi. Set layer, dimension, use of ms/ps, plotting, linetype, lwt, ctb/stb file standards, but IMO, if you want to have happy healthy working people, be flexible. Allow them the freedom to work with their computer how they feel best. Everybody's different. My command line is always blue with cyan text and my screen is always black. A guy across from me uses a somewhat blue screen. Whatever works.

M-dub

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Time Frame
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2004, 09:01:35 AM »
Ahhh....
That explains it MUCH better :)  I totally agree with you, Daron.  IMO, if standards, rules, guidelines...whatever a company decides to call them become too constricting, it becomes counter-productive.  Breathing room IS a key point.

Eloquintet

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Time Frame
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2004, 09:31:52 AM »
yeah i agree with those guys mostly. it's hard to put a true number on it it depends on your office environment. if the boss enforces the standard and everybody is open to suggestions and communication is good it's a fairly simple process but that is very rare. I have been compiling standards for my company i could share with you artisan. it's still a work in progress but it might give you some ideas. i'll upload it the the pond later today. good luck man
Dan

AutoCAD Architecture 2015