Author Topic: CTB FILES  (Read 11369 times)

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Josh Nieman

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2008, 09:40:07 PM »
TBH Cadmann... you make fun of that layer name, but I'd find yours just as unusual :P

CaddmannQ

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2008, 09:41:39 AM »
TBH? whazzat TBH?

Josh Nieman

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2008, 09:44:52 AM »

AUTOKAD

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2008, 10:16:27 AM »
Keep in mind the one I posted is our HALF-SIZE ctb for plotting 11x17... our full size is exactly double.

I wish there was more logic and order to our color table, but alas, I didn't make it, and I don't want to rock the boat by changing it and possibly messing up old drawings or current projects.




Thanks
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't it possible, that instead of making 2 ctb's for full and half size, you can just use one ctb file and just click on the 'scale lineweights' when you plotting half size?

see attachment

Josh Nieman

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2008, 10:21:00 AM »
Yea, I think ronjonp already pointed that out... and yea I'm aware... but... *sigh* old dogs here...

I told them that, once, and they kept using the Half Size CTB and also hitting scale lineweights, so they'd end up like half as thick.  After telling them the right way to do it about 3 dozen times i just forgot about it... it wasn't worth the hair I was pulling out over it.

*edit*  oops, fixed name
« Last Edit: March 05, 2008, 10:54:59 AM by Josh Nieman »

ronjonp

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #20 on: March 05, 2008, 10:48:24 AM »
Hey Josh....did you know that you can use scale lineweights?  :-D

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AUTOKAD

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2008, 06:45:50 PM »

I told them that, once, and they kept using the Half Size CTB and also hitting scale lineweights, so they'd end up like half as thick.  After telling them the right way to do it about 3 dozen times i just forgot about it... it wasn't worth the hair I was pulling out over it.


just curious, so instead of telling them to just click the 'scale lineweights' you (or somebody) have to re-create a 'half size' ctb, because thats what they're used to? Who created the half size ctb? And how old these guys are, if you don't mind me asking.


mjfarrell

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #22 on: March 06, 2008, 06:23:43 AM »
Auto,


In some of these things it isn't age that has anything to do with it. Either some people just don't 'get' it or they just wont change their habits. Let me give a perfect example; Inked Area Limits as 0,0 in Paperspace. This concept was so difficult for most to get used to and or adopt, that finally Autodesk gave in and in recent versions the user may chose to let the Edge of Paper be 0,0 OR for those that got it Inked Area Limits.  Why? I don't think it was age related, it had to do with folks who did, and still do use 'plot dots' too figure out what to plot when they plot By Window not by Layout, because they just can't or wont change their process, habits, or whatever.

Often my biggest challenge when teaching users MAP, or Civil 3D is to get them to let go of their old processes, and use the software in it's most effective way.  Often they have developed a work flow that doesn't, only they don't want to embrace anything new or different. Even if their way is less than optimal, it 'works' for them, even when they can't see the lost profits, or efficiencies of doing so.
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Josh Nieman

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2008, 09:17:28 AM »

I told them that, once, and they kept using the Half Size CTB and also hitting scale lineweights, so they'd end up like half as thick.  After telling them the right way to do it about 3 dozen times i just forgot about it... it wasn't worth the hair I was pulling out over it.

just curious, so instead of telling them to just click the 'scale lineweights' you (or somebody) have to re-create a 'half size' ctb, because thats what they're used to? Who created the half size ctb? And how old these guys are, if you don't mind me asking.

I'm the only CAD guy, the rest are engineers, for now.  Got a couple resume's to look over for CAD Techs though... I'm hopeful to get more.

Anyways, their age is relatively young, 34, 29, 26, and the new EIT is like 37 or so.  It's like mjfarrell said... it's just that they don't get it or are just stuck in their habits.

The Full Size and Half Size CTBs were brought over from their last company, mainly.  Their CAD guys were... dense... from what I understand, and the ones that were bright were forced to handicap themselves to suit the dense people who'd been there longer.

These guys are engineers mainly but due to having to do some part-time drafting of their stuff, they are forced to enter the CAD realm with only self-taught and second-hand habits/information.  I can try all I might, but sometimes they just don't care enough (as drafting is not their primary concern as engineers) to change habits that currently work.

CaddmannQ

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2008, 10:19:13 AM »
TBH? whazzat TBH?

To be honest.


Well, TBH with you, it is arcane and I know it wouldn't work for everyone. It works for what we do, because we're constantly drawing with a limited selection of element types. Also, bear in mind that it's worked without alteration since the days when we had an 8-pen plotter and had to type layer names. Remember that we were typing layer names when the proposals for AIA-type stardards were first publicised, and we were immediately shell-shocked by the concept of having to type names with 16 characters to change a layer. We were constantly changing layers. We swore we'd never adopt that method, and 16 years (and 12 versions of Autocad) later, we still have not.

Now, with Revit sill (perhaps) looming in our future,  Autodesk says it will become a non-issue. They're gonna take control of all that for us; but after playing with it on the side for a month I still don't see how 100% of the CD's could be efficiently created in Revit.

Josh Nieman

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #25 on: March 06, 2008, 10:31:08 AM »
Not saying your method is any worse, or anyone elses is any worse... just that's it's unfamiliar, just as the architects method you mentioned is unfamiliar and foreign to you.

We don't even have a standard around here.  Layering standards is what I'm going for next around here.

The boss and I have kind of agreed on an abomination of the AIA standard.

S-FNDTN-REBAR for foundation drawings for the rebar layer
A1-OFFC-WALL-INT for interior walls in the office within the building.. 1st floor
A2-MB-DOOR-EXT for exterior doors in the metal building at the second floor.
C-SITE-UE underground electric for the site....

We have to separate things a decent bit to allow for the flexibility our drawings require to work... turning things on.. off.. freezing, locking, changing visibility within viewports, etc...

It works for us and I don't think it's too illogical... I want people to know what's going on just by looking at the layer... to figure out what should be on it, while still not having a sentence-long layer name.

CaddmannQ

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Re: CTB FILES
« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2008, 12:41:37 PM »
I guess a lot depends on how you draw things. For instance we'd never confuse a 1st floor door with one on the second, because each plan in on a different drawing. We're not even intrested in the doors and windows except for location and approximate rough openings. Scheduling architectural items is the client's problem. Of course footprint changes require changing multiple plans, but we rarely do jobs where multiple floors do not radically change plans between floors anyway.

I've done CADD in several industries and diciplines now, and what always makes sense is what makes sense for that particular industry/dicipline. I really appreciate the flexibility of AutoCAD for that reason. If I'm drawing a weldment, or a drill jig, or a casting machine, or a vending machine, or a wine press, or a sliding storefront, or a curtain wall, or a steel framing plan, it can always be tailored to what makes the job easiest.