Author Topic: Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)  (Read 4734 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Crispy

  • Guest
Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« on: August 17, 2004, 01:08:08 PM »
Hi All

Could someone explain to me why to plot a drawing at 1:1 on a hewlett packard 750c Plus Plotter you must select oversize A0,A1,A2 and A3 page sizes.
If you select ISO A0,A1,A2,A3 part of the drawing border is missing,or the alternative is to plot scaled to fit.
I want to be able plot mainly at A3 @ 1:1 both on the plotter mentioned above or alternatively on a A3 laser printer.
I hope the above makes sense.
Thank you for taking the time to read this. :?

M-dub

  • Guest
Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2004, 01:24:23 PM »
Maybe you've already checked this out, but have a look at the size of your border and compare them to the margins you have set in the plotter properties.  This is just a start.  If it isn't the solution, post again and we'll move to the next step...

t-bear

  • Guest
Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2004, 01:36:15 PM »
Crispy...
You may have to set up a custom paper size.  We had to on our 750c Plus.... We also plot 1=1 and use window, picking the opposing corners of the t-block.......
Don't know if this will help, but that's 'bout as clever as this ol' b'aar gits!

Crispy

  • Guest
Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2004, 01:38:13 PM »
Hi
The borders are set to ISO A0,A1,A2 and A3. I am not sure what you mean about the margins you have set in the plotter properties.
Many thanks

M-dub

  • Guest
Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2004, 01:38:51 PM »
We had 4 different custom sizes on our old 650C.  We actually just had our new plotter/scanner/copier delivered today.  Setup will begin tomorrow morning.  HP 815mfp.  We'll see how it goes.  Quality is pretty good, but speed is not.  Ah well...we don't do a whole lot of high volume work anyway.

How's it goin' there, Crispy?

M-dub

  • Guest
Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2004, 01:42:20 PM »
What software are you using?  Windows, AutoCAD, etc...

If it isn't in the properties, maybe it's in the printer preferences.  To be honest, I'm not sure about the 750...like I said, we had a 650c.  They must be similar at least...

42

  • Bull Frog
  • Posts: 483
Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2004, 02:57:12 PM »
We have a 750C like yourself.  We used the ISO A1 594 x 841mm  If you are missing ploted information on the title block, click the 'plot upside down, you will then have a complete title box and loose any information from the left hand side of the sheet which should not matter. We also always plot to extents. (only works if the sheet is the only object on the screen).
We set up a custom sheet size of 829 x 558mm. The above combination has worked for us.


Alastair
Alastair Mallett Autodesk Certified Professional
Technical Director
Hunters South Architects

Craig

  • Guest
Re: Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2004, 03:15:27 PM »
Quote from: Crispy
Hi All

Could someone explain to me why to plot a drawing at 1:1 on a hewlett packard 750c Plus Plotter you must select oversize A0,A1,A2 and A3 page sizes.
If you select ISO A0,A1,A2,A3 part of the drawing border is missing,or the alternative is to plot scaled to fit.
I want to be able plot mainly at A3 @ 1:1 both on the plotter mentioned above or alternatively on a A3 laser printer.
I hope the above makes sense.
Thank you for taking the time to read this. :?


The problem we ran into using oversize on our plotter is if the sheet is 24x36 we'd actually get a sheet size of 25.5x36. Because of the margins we had to create custom sizes for different clients since MANY architects don't use proper 24x36 sheet borders. You only have to do it once and it's much easier using the custom setups...IMHO

sinc

  • Guest
Plotting @ 1:1 (why oversize?)
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2004, 11:20:13 PM »
Autocad lets you specify two areas for each size of paper - the paper size, and the plot area.  Actually, the plot area is defined by specifying the paper size and the size of the border on the top, bottom, left, and right of the sheet.  The border is a no-plot zone - nothing will be plotted there, and anything you plot will be cropped as it is sent to the plotter to fit inside this area.  The actual plot area is listed on the plot dialogue box as "printable area" underneath the paper size.

The default settings for most plotters include every paper size twice, one of them called "Oversize".  In the page definition, the "Oversize" setting has all borders set to 0, while the other definition has the borders set to some non-zero value.  If you use "plot to layout", you'll see the plot area indicated by a dashed line on the layout.

You can adjust all these definitions in the custom settings of the plotter (pc3 file).