Author Topic: Long time lesson  (Read 2354 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

kdub_nz

  • Mesozoic keyThumper
  • SuperMod
  • Water Moccasin
  • Posts: 2132
  • class keyThumper<T>:ILazy<T>
Long time lesson
« on: July 19, 2023, 10:15:18 PM »
After playing around with C# in TheBeast for about 20 years part time I'm continually learning the lesson "Read the freaking docs"

They're not perfect, but they're better than guessing and sometimes more accurate than asking mrs Google ( 'she who knows all' )

I can't understand how anyone who isn't aware of this can survive and remain sane.

Stay Well
Called Kerry in my other life
Retired; but they dragged me back in !

I live at UTC + 13.00

---
some people complain about loading the dishwasher.
Sometimes the question is more important than the answer.

It's Alive!

  • Retired
  • Needs a day job
  • Posts: 8690
  • AKA Daniel
Re: Long time lesson
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2023, 12:18:58 AM »
Especially these, languages are evolving at a good clip. Bad things are being depreciated, new ways of doing things.

Atook

  • Swamp Rat
  • Posts: 1029
  • AKA Tim
Re: Long time lesson
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2023, 10:56:21 AM »
Do you mean these docs?

I've honestly had a hard time with the Autodesk .NET documentation. I remember finding some of the early ones helpful, with good code examples etc. At some point I couldn't find them or the ones I found weren't as helpful and gave up on them. I'm not patient enough and just end up searching and asking on forums. And as you'd predict, I have not remained sane.  :uglystupid2:

If you've got a better link, please post it.

Jeff H

  • Needs a day job
  • Posts: 6150
Re: Long time lesson
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2023, 05:26:53 PM »
I always found the objectarx docs the most useful to read about the functions they were wrapping.


It's Alive!

  • Retired
  • Needs a day job
  • Posts: 8690
  • AKA Daniel
Re: Long time lesson
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2023, 06:28:38 PM »
I always found the objectarx docs the most useful to read about the functions they were wrapping.
This, I have a shortcut to arxref.chm on my desktop, sometimes I find myself with three or four instances open