Author Topic: 3d practice  (Read 6007 times)

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jonesy

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3d practice
« on: June 21, 2005, 02:25:55 PM »
Does anyone here have a drawing/rough sketch that I can use to brush up on my 3d skills. We only do 2d drawings at work and it doesnt look like we will ever make the move to 3d :cry:
I used to do (and teach) 3d at a local college, but I havent had the need (read here - so I havent been bothered) to do any 3d modelling. I have in the past done solids and surfaces so I will have a go at anything.
I went for an interview a little while back, to a company that uses 3d, but because I have never used it in anger, I couldnt get my brain to think in the third dimension.

I currently work in the civils field, and have in the past worked in architecture and layout design, so anything in these areas I may understand what I am trying to do. (but I will try my hand at any 3d work)

Maybe if I can produce a good enough model, I could take it in to work with the argument of going 3d, who knows 8)

If you can help you could either PM, e-mail or let me know via the boards, I would be very grateful.
Many thanks
Thanks for explaining the word "many" to me, it means a lot.

daron

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3d practice
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2005, 02:31:59 PM »
Just design a simple floor plan and model it?

jonesy

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3d practice
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2005, 02:40:42 PM »
Quote from: daron
Just design a simple floor plan and model it?

In the past I have done my house, and the mobile homes we own, but I would like to do something with a bit more meaning, or more complex. Having seen the stuff some of you guys produce on a day to day job I can only sit back in and look on in envy (it is something I would like to be doing given half the chance). Some of my old (release 12) models are now being used by the local colleges for grading exercises in exams, they were fairly complex for schooling, but nothing like you'd come across in a working environment. I just need a chance to get my brain into gear, and produce some nice visuals (in case I should happen to start looking for a new job :wink: )
Thanks for explaining the word "many" to me, it means a lot.

MSTG007

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3d practice
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2005, 02:54:38 PM »
hes got a point... you guys are regulars.  whats the secrets!:) please
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daron

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3d practice
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2005, 03:17:43 PM »
MSTG007, Jonesy's female. Anyway, it can be complicated to say exactly what to do. I had a friend back in school that showed me a neat little trick to understanding the intersect command. Draw your initials, set them in a cube, extrude them and use intersect to get different effects. That was a good exercise. I did a little mechanical stuff in school, but only architecture since. Now, if you really want to get 3d going, get a program specific to the field. ADT, LDD, MAP. MDT, Inventor. If you want to really get into 3d presentation VIZ is good for many applications. MAX, Maya, Form-Z would be your top dog's. If you want a free one, POVRAY. That last one can be very complicated depending on the release. My windows version, you have to know how to program in c and my Linux one is a graphics piece of cake. Still, in any case, when it comes to 3D presentation software, the time it takes to learn it can be daunting as well as a turn off by many companies. Look into the GIMP for free graphics software. It's a wonderful program.

MSTG, as far as your other thread goes, I once did the things you ask. All the things I listed, I had to use for that exact same purpose. I wasn't trying to be vague or rude, but there is so much you can do and so many ways to tackle it.

Tracey, I'm also not trying to be vague here, but I'm sure you realize it isn't cut-n-dry here. 3D never is and the multitude of software just makes it a more daunting task. I'd say you're on the right track towards getting your foot in the door though.

Keith™

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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2005, 03:40:42 PM »
I am wondering what the extent of usefulness of 3d would be in civil work. I understand that it would useful in topographical, but then you would only normally present that in 2d anyway.

I would suggest for brushing up on 3d modeling that you look into doing some of the mechanical exercises that are available in many of the AutoCAD mechanical books.
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t-bear

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3d practice
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2005, 03:55:32 PM »
Tracey....... I've got a few things you might play around with....PM me your e'mail addy......
Be aware, it's mechanical.......good practice though, and if/when you hit a bump, I'll help you back up. LOL

MSTG007

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« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2005, 04:29:27 PM »
we try to give the developer who we work with an idea of what the site looks like in 3d and plan view when we submit a concept or presentation. plus, we are starting to design in 3D with contours and pavement and building pads that way we do not have just numbers on the drawings but real life objects.

then we usually get the construction staking for the jobs and we just click where we want and off they go..

so i kinda gave you a brief idea of what we are shooting for in our office
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ronjonp

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3d practice
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2005, 04:50:24 PM »
One start would be to do a search for 3D objects in the help file. There is quite of bit of info on how to create and manipulate them.

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CADaver

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3d practice
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2005, 08:18:49 PM »
How big is your mailbox? I have some equipment structures or piping models I could send, but these suckers are big.

Bob

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3d practice
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2005, 03:38:32 AM »
Try this  

http://www.theswamp.org/lilly_pond/bob/G12609.dwg

It it a 2D drawing in the process of turning 3D

jonesy

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« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2005, 05:24:00 AM »
Quote from: Bob
Try this  

http://www.theswamp.org/lilly_pond/bob/G12609.dwg

It it a 2D drawing in the process of turning 3D


Bob, thanks for putting the drawing there, but when I try to access it it says drawing format unrecognised. I am working on 2004, what version is this?

Many thanks
Thanks for explaining the word "many" to me, it means a lot.

Bob

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3d practice
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2005, 05:44:40 AM »
I have reuploaded the file.

Tried it on a colleague's machine and OK.

Should be in ACAD2K version so you should be able to open it.

Alternatively you can see my email address in the message you I just sent you. (I don't want to post it here).

jonesy

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« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2005, 07:01:56 AM »
Quote from: CADaver
How big is your mailbox? I have some equipment structures or piping models I could send, but these suckers are big.


Thanks for your very kind offer Randy.
Thanks for explaining the word "many" to me, it means a lot.

3DJACK

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« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2005, 12:31:12 PM »
I have been doing AutoCAD 3D for over 10 years and I love it.  There are 2 real keys to working in 3D.  One is learning to manipulate the UCS for those odd angles and alignments.  The second key is learning to use the XYZ point filters.  Tracking is similar but in 3D you have to keep the Z axis in mind.  I and a friend created 4 great little macro's for working in 3D with the XYZ point filters.  I am going to post them each on a line to keep them separate.  They are on a toolbar plus my pop0 menu.  The XYZ point filters are used more than any other command in AutoCAD when working in 3D.  The point filters allow you to have 8 decimals of accuracy if you want or need it.  
[.X @].YZ;none;@;
[.Y @].XZ;none;@;
[.Z @].XY;none;@;
[Pick XY].Z;NONE;@;
These use the base point you pick as the @ pick point so you only have to pick the location you want to move to and you don't get any bad moves.  The other thing I found to help a bunch was to draw using 4 paperspace viewports.  I setup the viewports with a plan, elevation, side and 3D perspective views.  When I go to the plan, elevation and side viewports the UCS is automatically flipped to align with that viewport.  The beauty of PS viewports is you can freeze and thaw layers in individual viewports which is a BIG help.  Any questions let me know.  I just joined this web site today 6/23/2005.  I guess I should add that 3D is actually easier than 2D once you really learn 3D good.  I would have attached a sample setup drawing but I didn't see a way to do such.  Good luck, Jack Foster.