Author Topic: Delete .net  (Read 212 times)

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nobody

  • Swamp Rat
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Delete .net
« on: November 07, 2020, 02:59:26 AM »
If you could go back and get the the years you spent in .net back and replace it with another skill, what would that be?

For me, I think I would have worked on fishing more. Kidding. I think I would have wanted to learn sound/audio engineering for concerts. It seems fun.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2020, 03:04:05 AM by nobody »

SEANT

  • Bull Frog
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Re: Delete .net
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2020, 03:11:35 AM »
Should we infer that your resources devoted to .NET are considered a waste of time?

I do have to agree, though, sound engineering for concerts does sound pretty fun. 8-)
Sean Tessier
AutoCAD 2016 Mechanical

nobody

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Re: Delete .net
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2020, 07:46:44 AM »
Should we infer that your resources devoted to .NET are considered a waste of time?

I do have to agree, though, sound engineering for concerts does sound pretty fun. 8-)

It's paid off well. It was actually my only path for advancement at one point and I feel it's given me options.

More or less I just feel I have one more 5 year round of learning something new in my life. After that I think I'll be ready for simpler things (like fishing, or drawing for no reason). 

On one hand I want to focus on something fun, easy, laid back.  On the other I want to climb up a hill and conquer something, sort of like it felt learning .Net.  I'm trying to decide what I want. For the difficult, I'm leaning machine learning, but I'll have to go all the way back to math I've not touched in 20 years (linear algebra, statistical junk, calculus). That will take a year or two by itself. Everything in CAD is just trig/geometry/basic algebra/a little bit of vector stuff but nothing too tough. And machine learning will be a saturated market in a few years anyway. All the people that can be doing it, will be doing it, and will be way better at higher math than I can ever reach in what's left of my life. So probably a waist of time.

I am hoping to hear what kind of things people would pick now that they are old and wise.  Would people even pick anything related to computers?

SEANT

  • Bull Frog
  • Posts: 340
Re: Delete .net
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2020, 03:26:57 AM »
"Would people even pick anything related to computers?"

Computers, the versatile tools that they are, will play a part in many of the cutting edge endeavors, I believe.  At one time the ambiguous quality of 'good with computers' was what it took to get a nice office job. Industry has focused on more specific qualities given the ubiquitous computer use.

I think I hear what you are saying, though. My career/retirement transition looms, and, no doubt, faculties and endurance are well crested - different options need to be analyzed.   Ideally I'd salvage skills I've already learned to cobble together some late term career.  The highly mutable marketplace makes choosing difficult but does provide an ever present opportunity to get in on the ground floor. 

Machine learning leapt out of the gate but many furlongs remain.  Perhaps the AI industry would benefit from the old world perspective that these young whippersnapper grads can't provide.  I still like 'Smart Contracts', and their potential to insinuate into the marketplace and society at large.  All risky stuff, though.  Apparently the choices we make as older adults are no less speculative than those of marketplace newbies.
Sean Tessier
AutoCAD 2016 Mechanical

nobody

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  • .net stuff
Re: Delete .net
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2020, 08:56:11 AM »
"Would people even pick anything related to computers?"

Computers, the versatile tools that they are, will play a part in many of the cutting edge endeavors, I believe.  At one time the ambiguous quality of 'good with computers' was what it took to get a nice office job. Industry has focused on more specific qualities given the ubiquitous computer use.

I think I hear what you are saying, though. My career/retirement transition looms, and, no doubt, faculties and endurance are well crested - different options need to be analyzed.   Ideally I'd salvage skills I've already learned to cobble together some late term career.  The highly mutable marketplace makes choosing difficult but does provide an ever present opportunity to get in on the ground floor. 

Machine learning leapt out of the gate but many furlongs remain.  Perhaps the AI industry would benefit from the old world perspective that these young whippersnapper grads can't provide.  I still like 'Smart Contracts', and their potential to insinuate into the marketplace and society at large.  All risky stuff, though.  Apparently the choices we make as older adults are no less speculative than those of marketplace newbies.

Appreciate the thoughts.

WILL HATCH

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  • Posts: 450
Re: Delete .net
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2020, 06:02:46 PM »
Don't think I would. This was a great place to get started, and is essentially unbounded as you apply the skills to new challenges. At the end of the day programming is still in many ways a microcosm of the physical world.

Machine learning leapt out of the gate but many furlongs remain.  Perhaps the AI industry would benefit from the old world perspective that these young whippersnapper grads can't provide.
Having spent the past year scouring the pages and lectures for Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs I can really appreciate the vision we had coming into this, and am looking forward to seeing the industry mature and get closer to following through.