Author Topic: To model complex object  (Read 721 times)

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Lupo76

  • Bull Frog
  • Posts: 313
To model complex object
« on: August 10, 2019, 03:00:16 AM »
Hi everyone,
I know AutoCAD and BricsCAD 3D regarding the modeling of 3D solid objects with flat surfaces (extrudes, Boolean operations, etc.)

Unfortunately I don't know where to start to model the seat of a chair that has an uneven shape (see attached file).
The result of the modeling should be a 3d solid and not a mesh.

Can you give me some indication or video tutorial on how to start?

Thanks in advance.
Lupo

CAB

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Re: To model complex object
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2019, 08:06:49 AM »
It is another level of CAD to do 3D but just takes time and patients & a good use of Z-snaps. :)I have done a few 3D items but am still learning.  https://sketchfab.com/ab2draft/models
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Lupo76

  • Bull Frog
  • Posts: 313
Re: To model complex object
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2019, 01:51:48 AM »
It is another level of CAD to do 3D but just takes time and patients & a good use of Z-snaps. :)I have done a few 3D items but am still learning.  https://sketchfab.com/ab2draft/models

Hi,
Thank you for your answer.
I saw your models but probably they were made with sketchup that works with surfaces.
I need to get 3D Solids (ACIS).

Is there a way to create the file that I have attached in AutoCAD or BricsCAD?
What are the commands and / or techniques to achieve this result?

CAB

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Re: To model complex object
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2019, 08:17:34 AM »
The USCG, Grate & St Thomas were made using BricsCAD.The others were made using Chief Architect.
Looking at the chair, I would think a modeling software other that CAD would be more appropriate.I think it could be done in CAD but that is beyond may skill set.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2019, 08:24:28 AM by CAB »
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Master_Shake

  • Swamp Rat
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Re: To model complex object
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2019, 09:02:34 AM »
You're already kind of half way there. You just need to convert the mesh into a solid. Check out the command convtosolid.

Unfortuantely, the program which outputted the mesh did a crummy job and I don't there is an easy way to really accomplish what you need quickly.

dgorsman

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Re: To model complex object
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2019, 11:03:17 AM »
Haven't looked at the file yet, but this is sounding more and more like a job for Fusion 360.
If you are going to fly by the seat of your pants, expect friction burns.

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Lupo76

  • Bull Frog
  • Posts: 313
Re: To model complex object
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2019, 02:00:22 AM »
You're already kind of half way there. You just need to convert the mesh into a solid. Check out the command convtosolid.

Unfortuantely, the program which outputted the mesh did a crummy job and I don't there is an easy way to really accomplish what you need quickly.

I didn't make this file myself.

I am aware that there are more suitable software for this type of modeling but I need to understand how to model it with AutoCAD or BricsCAD. It doesn't matter that this takes a long time, the important thing is to be able to reach the goal

How can I use AutoCAD/BricsCAD meshes to get a similar compatible model later with ConvToSolid?

ribarm

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  • Marko Ribar, architect
Re: To model complex object
« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2019, 03:32:13 AM »
You should be able to model almost anything with LOFTing technique and create 3DSOLIDs directly, just be sure you create correct amount of correct cross sections before you apply LOFT on them (of course in correct selection order), or alternatively use guidline curves as well...
Marko Ribar, d.i.a. (graduated engineer of architecture)

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