Author Topic: 3d skills  (Read 4894 times)

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dubb

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3d skills
« on: March 08, 2005, 12:52:57 PM »
i really suck at 3d but im trying to create a landscape plans and also design other types of metal type mounts and fixtures for the automotive industry. my question is...how can i improve the material library? every time i use materials they tend to look cheap. when i render raytrace i dont see edges on objects, rather i just see on sold peice. can someone send me a rendering they have done in 3d, im curious because ive seen all kinds of 3d stuff that was done in autocad by other. how the heck can i do just as good as they?

t-bear

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3d skills
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2005, 02:30:13 PM »
Dubb...
Most of the stuff you're seeing is not *just* AutoCAD, but proggys like 3D Max and Viz.  These are the most used render packages.  Rendering in CAD sucks.  It's very basic.  I don't do any rendering here so I can't comment on the ways & means of these render pkgs.  There are some others (Hendie, you listening?) who are much more qualified. I'll leave it up to them to carry on.........

hendie

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3d skills
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2005, 02:47:48 PM »
as the bear has stated, renderign in plain autocad is just too much trouble for the results you can get. it is possible but takes forever and a day.
I use Viz or Max for rendering ~ you can see a couple of samples of my rendering over on http://www.resourcecad.com/rendering/ ~ those were done in either Viz or Max

CADaver

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3d skills
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2005, 03:57:09 PM »
As others have pointed out, rendering in ACAD is, at best a visualization tool, NOT a presentation tool.  It's perfectly fine for use as a design aid, but if you need presentation quality renderings another tool is necessary.

dubb

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3d skills
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2005, 04:20:06 PM »
oo.I..C....,
ive always thought that autocad lacks the rendering capabilities, have any of you heard of http://www.accurender.com/ they have a third party program as a part of autocad. do you think that this program is capable to enough to do renderings, im asking because it dont really know how to use the rendering programs like viz...although i have solidworks, but i dont know how to use it as well.

thanks

CADaver

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3d skills
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2005, 04:27:58 PM »
Quote from: dubb
.. have any of you heard of http://www.accurender.com/ they have a third party program as a part of autocad. do you think that this program is capable to enough to do renderings,
The last time I used it, gee R11, it produced an acceptable rendering for a quickie presentation, but nothing I would try on an important client if we needed a slick presentation.  We don't do much presentation work, what we do usually consists of pointing at an unit we've built and saying "We'll do one of those for this much".

SMadsen

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3d skills
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2005, 07:13:01 PM »
dubb, if you do play around with rendering in native AutoCAD, check out the 3DCONFIG command. There are a few options that may come in handy.

I've heard nothing but good about AccuRender but haven't really tried it out.

dubb

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3d skills
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2005, 02:03:19 PM »
...3dconfig...im gonna check it out. yea, im about to try out this accurender thing....

thanks

t-bear

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3d skills
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2005, 02:11:38 PM »
Give us a "review" after you've played a bit.

CADaver

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3d skills
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2005, 02:38:50 PM »
Had me goin' on 3DCONFIG there for a minute, then I snapped that it was a new setvar in R2004.

http://www.hyperpics.com/commands/

cadbrowser

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3d skills
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2005, 04:58:59 PM »


I've done a lot of 3D-Work and the most complex was a 3d design of a substation for power distribution going in a really testy part of the downtown area here in Kansas City.

I agree that the plain packaged stuff that comes with AutoCAD isn't that great.  So what I did was downloaded some image maps typically used for games like Doom, Halo, Max Payne, and the like and yanked out some stuff there and imported it into my AutoCAD renderning library.  Tell ya what after playing with a few variables I had that baby looking pretty nice.

Anybody wants a picture of it just let me know!

I even contoured the parking lot, curb & gutter, street, and the grassy areas with trees and all kinds of stuff.  I plotted out various perspectives of it depending on where you were staning, how you were looking and etc...was very cool.

Well when the Engineer took the samples to a meeting, they ended up picking a different spot (one not so testy) that the same guy owned...he was so impressed that he stole those images from the engineer!

The whole drawing file is about 50Mb in size but I did some screen captures of the finised rendering and saved them to jpegs.

Anyway...Sorry to ramble on.

But there might be some good ideas (in there somewhere) that might help if your boss is unwilling to spend money on special 3D software for one presentation.


hyposmurf

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3d skills
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2005, 06:33:35 PM »
There are a number of cheaper rendering programs around to, providing new upcoming competition for 3D max and accurender
Bryce
Vue 5

jorgen

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3d skills
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2005, 11:52:18 PM »
Tons of renderers/modellers out there. 'Radiosity' is one, 'Blender' is another (free).
Don't let the 'free' thing put you off, Blender's interface is a lot like Lightwave (another modeller) and it supports at least two plugin renderers that I know of. You can get about the same milage as Max or Viz out of it.

Accurender is a good one too - does 'walkarounds' if you have a 3D model.
A lot of guys make movies with it. A lot of overhead though and you're 'locked' into the camera sequence you hand it. I've been more into 'real-time' stuff using opengl to dynamically move through (or just move) a model - you can still save the frames if you're into movies, but you don't have to wait overnight for all the T&L (texturing and lighting) for each frame to happen 'cause you use a game-engine to drive your scene, like Quake, or any other fast bsp engine with frustum culling and space partitioning to get your frame-rate down.

In fact, here's some guys that took that idea and ran with it for Max:
http://www.cubicspace.com

Tony