Author Topic: 3-D Dynamic Blocks  (Read 3502 times)

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Bethrine

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3-D Dynamic Blocks
« on: May 08, 2014, 06:48:53 PM »
Are these possible? I have a cylinder I am trying to stretch and can't seem to place the second point for a linear parameter.
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JNieman

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2014, 07:31:36 PM »
Short answer: Nope.

Long answer:  Not exactly.

You can create visibility states for each bolt size in a range... it'll bloat your models a bit depending on how you use them though.

mjfarrell

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2014, 07:44:58 PM »
yes, you can
I will elaborate later

However the 'trick' is to define that cylinder in it's own UCS

We did it for some rack and shelving systems in a class I taught.

I might have to review exact process, however it can be done.

It isn't supposed to, but I have made it.
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mjfarrell

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2014, 06:50:03 AM »
OK, double checked my notes we were doing this with 2d elements not 3d solids
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Bethrine

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2014, 10:04:42 AM »
Glad I asked, I spent a good amount of time trying to figure out why it wasn't working.  :laugh:

It sucks though. I do pretty much everything in 3D.  :-(
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Master_Shake

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2014, 11:52:52 AM »
Unfortunately no, just have to make separate blocks of required dimensions. However if you are making cylinders the length is simply the last variable. Not sure how much time could be gained with a dynamic block in this case.

Bethrine

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2014, 11:57:26 AM »
My set-up was to use visibility to choose the size I wanted to use (we have a standard 6 sizes that we make normal use of) and be able to adjust the length of the bolt. I am not required to draw threads and have even been asked not to in order to save time. The size of the bolt head is important for space issues as well as the length and diameter.
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mjfarrell

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2014, 12:41:53 PM »
My set-up was to use visibility to choose the size I wanted to use (we have a standard 6 sizes that we make normal use of) and be able to adjust the length of the bolt. I am not required to draw threads and have even been asked not to in order to save time. The size of the bolt head is important for space issues as well as the length and diameter.

This is where inventor or even ASD really shines
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Bethrine

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2014, 01:09:52 PM »
My set-up was to use visibility to choose the size I wanted to use (we have a standard 6 sizes that we make normal use of) and be able to adjust the length of the bolt. I am not required to draw threads and have even been asked not to in order to save time. The size of the bolt head is important for space issues as well as the length and diameter.

This is where inventor or even ASD really shines

Yes. I have been using a LOT of Inventor! It's great for this! I haven't used ASD though.

I was told not to lose AutoCAD though so I've been finding misc. projects to work on. I'm sort of going back and forth on them so as not to burn out on one thing. Dynamic blocks are something I really want to be able to do. I guess I chose the wrong project.
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johnratliff

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2014, 01:58:15 PM »
The parameters only seem to work in 2d. however, I have been successful with rotated faces. Apparently grip points along are the key. You can stretch faces in the z value.

What I have not been able to figure out how to do is stretch an extrusion grip in a block. If you take a polyline and extrude it, it will be given a height value [height=1]. I would like to be able to access that value, but it doesn't come across as a property. I was thinking maybe it could be tied to a constraint [construction line] but I'm not sure how.

steve.carson

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2014, 01:24:38 AM »
I've had the same experience as you, John. Can't stretch an extrusion grip. However, you can have a lofted surface be associative to two identical polylines and move the polylines with the dynamic properties to mimic the affect. The only thing I don't like is that solprof doesn't work on surfaces once you explode the block. Moves, rotates, and arrays work on solids, but you're limited to all the actions happening in the x-y plane. To make things easier I usually build the 3d elements outside of the block editor and copy/paste them in. Just gotta be mindful of the ucs.

dgorsman

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Re: 3-D Dynamic Blocks
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2014, 02:07:03 PM »
The modification methods of a lot of the vertical and third-party applications which work with custom objects or 3D solids re-create the solids from scratch each time rather than modify the existing solid.  This puts the parametric behaviour "outside" of the solid entity ie. the only solid manipulation is creation and erasing.
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try {GreatPower;}
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