Author Topic: Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards  (Read 28631 times)

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M-dub

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« on: February 10, 2005, 08:43:57 AM »
Just wondering what everyone uses as a standard for revision cloud & triangle layers.
There have been a few different practices here, but this what we currently (try) to use:
- All modifications to drawing are done on proper layer
- Revision Triangle block is inserted on layer "REV"
- Revision Cloud is created on layer "REV1", "REV2", etc.
- All triangles will be visible at all times (unless drawing gets too crowded, etc)
- Only the current revision cloud should be visible (on and thawed)

Anything to add / change?

CADaver

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2005, 08:53:38 AM »
Here, revision clouds and triangles for current revision only, both on layer REV.  
Previous revision clouds and triangles are deleted.

M-dub

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2005, 09:07:45 AM »
I don't mind that one. Actually, I prefer that, but for some reason, they want some form of historical tracking.  They can look at the Rev block (Dates, descriptions, etc), thaw the rev cloud to show where the changes occurred, then they can refer to the project file if more research is required.  Overkill, I know, but it goes back to the "That's how it's always been done around here." story.  Just because it's always been done doesn't make it right.

jonesy

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2005, 09:09:07 AM »
How would that work if the area of work was a large, irregular shape, that has only a minor modification. We tend to work on civil stuff and any modification, say to the depth of the excavation, may extend along a road for many metres. Would you put a plottable cloud around the whole area and why.  My thoughts were to put a revision triangle on a plottable layer, but the cloud on a non plot, so it is more a visual aid. Any comments on why or why not to do it this way
Thanks for explaining the word "many" to me, it means a lot.

M-dub

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2005, 09:21:49 AM »
I think that our drawing disciplines call for different practices.  Yours might make sense for Civil, but in the Inst / Elect field, ours makes sense...or seems to anyway.

I forgot to mention, the clouds should be thawed when the drawing reaches 'As Built' status.  (Show clouds only during design and commissioning phases)

Wyatt Earp

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2005, 03:29:06 PM »
I agree with CADaver:

All my stuff goes on a Layer called _Rev. I keep all triangles (after Rev 0 - IFC) to allow for tracking of extras and so on. Clouds get modified to suit.

Cheers

CADaver

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2005, 03:31:51 PM »
Quote from: Wyatt Earp
I agree with CADaver:
Be careful with that, it could get you in trouble  :lol:

BAshworth

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2005, 03:39:23 PM »
Our standard is to create two layers for each revision. REV#_CLOUD and REV#_DELTA.  Cloud layers are colors that end in 2, delta layers are colors that end in 4. (for plot style reasons.)

We turn off the cloud layers for earlier revisions, and only plot the clouds for the current delta.

We have to do this because our revisions are based off of the architects scheduling, and they don't always go in order.  (ie. Delta 4 will sometimes go out before Delta 3)

MP

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2005, 03:41:21 PM »
Quote from: Wyatt Earp
I agree with CADaver ...

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CADaver

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2005, 03:43:15 PM »
Quote from: MP
Quote from: Wyatt Earp
I agree with CADaver ...

Adjusting scorecard.
I gotta see this scorecard someday.

jwisherd

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2005, 04:49:15 PM »
We call our revisions addendums, so our layers are named
Addendum-1  4-17-05
Every set of addendums gets a revision layer with the issue date as part of the name, for tracking purposes.

David Hall

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2005, 09:14:37 AM »
We use 2 layers: Anno-Revs for the clouds, and Anno-Text for the rev delta.  We remove old clouds and deltas when the job is "As Built"
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whdjr

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Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2005, 09:55:46 AM »
We make a secondary file with a revision date in the filename and cloud the revision that way we have two seperate files, one original unchanged and one revised file.

Royalchill

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Re: Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2005, 01:25:08 PM »
Looks like your doing it right to me. We do the same  :lol:

glee

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Re: Revision Cloud & Triangle Standards
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2005, 03:24:13 PM »
- All modifications to drawing are done on proper layer
- Revision Triangle block is inserted on layer "REV"
- Revision Cloud is created on layer "REV1", "REV2", etc.
- All triangles will be visible at all times (unless drawing gets too crowded, etc)
- Only the current revision cloud should be visible (on and thawed)
We do it somewhat similar. 

Keeping the triangles has somewhat to do with certain permitting agencies requiring that they know how many revisions or addendums you have carried out.  Since their level of trust for people in the AEC field being somewhat small to non existent.  This way when they review your drawings, they can track changes since the original permit set was issued (that way you can't try to slip one over them).
The other factor is for public bid jobs.  Since a bunch of addendums can sometimes be issued during the bid process it helps contractors keep track of the changes, especially if they did not receive an addendum.  This way it keeps a level playing field. 
Say, contractor A did not receive addendum #2 and is blissfully unaware, then when addendum#3 appears, they note the triangles for #2 and scream blue murder at the architect or in todays' world, the reprographics company trying to make a few more bucks by pretending they know how to run public bids and hosting drawings on their web site.