Author Topic: Zoom Scale factor  (Read 11975 times)

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CADaver

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2004, 01:35:45 PM »
Quote from: PDJ
You don't have anough room for dual flat screens??
Nope, not enough room in the budget either.

Quote from: PDJ
That's gotta be one SMALL desk..
As a design lead, I get 2- 30"X60" tables in a corner (everyone else gets one), one for the computer the other for the 300,000 pounds of paperwork involved in running a bleeding job.  Half the time I have to put my coffee cup on the floor with the rest of my reference material.

Quote from: PDJ
and here I thought everything was BIG in Texas.. heheh..
5 years ago we had a lot of room to spread out, but then we had less money to invest.  Now we have plenty of money, but no room.  We have two guys sitting at tables setup in the drawing vault.  We took in half the front lobby and added space for two more engineers.  We even have several guys scattered out in 3 conference rooms.  When we need those for meeting, the guys have to figure out who's in the meeting and go use their machines.  Even with all these new guys, we're a little short-handed, but short of setting them up in the men's room stalls, we don't have any more space available.

ML

  • Guest
Scale Pulldown
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2004, 07:00:51 PM »
If anyone is interested, I created this little addition to my custom pulldown menu. In paperspace, tiled to model, just click your desired scale and viola. Of course you can add on to this if you like ie ---->
[1/20]^C^Cz;1/120xp;

Mark


ID_SCALE  [->Scale Drawing]
                 [1/16]^C^Cz;1/192xp;
                 [--]
                 [1/8]^C^C_z;1/96xp;
                 [--]
                 [1/4]^C^Cz;1/48xp;
                 [--]
                 [<-1/1]^C^Cz;1/1xp;

AVCAD

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2004, 11:23:39 AM »
Quote from: PDJ
zoom
1/20xp

You were SOOOO close..


ACTUALLY....if you are in floating paper space the command is...

zoom;s;1/20xp

OHHHH...you were so close!  8)

CADaver

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2004, 11:26:59 AM »
Quote from: AVCAD
Quote from: PDJ
zoom
1/20xp

You were SOOOO close..


ACTUALLY....if you are in floating paper space the command is...

zoom;s;1/20xp

OHHHH...you were so close!  8)


The "S" is unnecessary

ML

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2004, 06:26:31 PM »
Actually I am perfectly correct

If you were doing 1" = 10' then your scale factor would be 1/120xp
1" is representing a foot (12")
12X10=120

As far as the macro is concerned you do not use the S

It is zoom (Z) enter (;) 1/120xp enter (;)

Did you see the pulldown menu I posted? It works perfect.

I thought that the person that started this post could make use of it

Mark

ML

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2004, 06:28:04 PM »
They were suppose to be semicolons in the above macro but I got smileys instead :)

CADaver

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2004, 06:51:13 PM »
Quote from: ML
They were suppose to be semicolons in the above macro but I got smileys instead :)


Quote this message then follow below.

See the little code box above the message pane

If you wrap posted code in square brackets [ ] around the word CODE and /CODE it won't do that.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

<square bracket>CODE<square bracket>

code stuff

<square bracket>/CODE<square bracket>

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Like this:


Code: [Select]
code stuff

ML

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2004, 06:53:35 PM »
Hummm

Not sure I understand

hendie

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2004, 07:06:53 PM »
when you're posting code. after you've typed it, select it, then hit the CODE button right above where you're typing ~ it will automatically wrap your selection in
[ code ] your code stuff here [/ code ] (but with no spaces)
like
Code: [Select]
your code stuff here
simple, no ?

ML

  • Guest
Test
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2004, 07:25:33 PM »
;;;;;

ML

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #25 on: September 17, 2004, 07:26:15 PM »
I see, thank you

I just disabled smileys and it worked well also

PDJ

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #26 on: September 17, 2004, 09:01:52 PM »
If you're really confused about scale factors and how big 1/8th inch text should be when the scale is 1:20, take a look at the CadCARD.  Just do a search on Autograph technical services.

The CadCARD is a slide rule card, printed on both front and back with one side having all kinds of drawing scale settings on it and the other having dimvars settings.  

My card sits right next to my Nostromo N52 and goes with me wherever I do Cad work.  I even have a second one for my home computer.  I't around $12.00 and worth ten times that much.  I've been using one I bought way back in R11 and it's still goin strong..

Check it out, it's worth a look.

http://www.cadcard.com/

ML

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #27 on: September 17, 2004, 09:41:41 PM »
LOL

This is  pretty elementary CAD

Listen, if you have 1/8" = 1'
Then take the 8, times it by 12 (as there is 12 inches in a foot), this equals 96

96 is your scale factor

Likewise 1/4"= 1'   ( 4 X 12) 48 is your scale factor

Now, what I was referring to earlier was 1" = 10' (Architectural Units)
Not 1:20 which is engineering units

So, once again, if you take 12 as 1 inch is representing a foot, then you simply times 12X10 and 120 is your scale factor

Of course it can get complicated if you want.

Pop Quiz:

Can anyone tell me what the scale factor would be for 4" = 5680'   :P

ML

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #28 on: September 17, 2004, 09:48:10 PM »
Hey PD


I see where the confusion started   LOL
I originally put    [1/20]^C^Cz;1/120xp;

OK, that is how I display it on The Pulldown we use in work, it is short for 1"=20' not 1/20   Perhaps I shouls say 1/20'

Sorry about that


Mark

CADaver

  • Guest
Zoom Scale factor
« Reply #29 on: September 17, 2004, 10:21:38 PM »
15840

4" = 1 mile
1'= 3 miles
1'=15840'