Author Topic: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?  (Read 10527 times)

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Bob Wahr

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2008, 12:51:17 PM »
I was wondering  SIP to me is Structural Insulated Panel, not composite deck.

Josh Nieman

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2008, 01:50:14 PM »
I was wondering  SIP to me is Structural Insulated Panel, not composite deck.

Yea, that's one of the terms I hate because both are very common, but the manufacturer's, suppliers, contractors, and such also refer to that deck as a SIP system.  *shrug*  I tend to write it out to avoid confusion...because it confuses me sometimes, hehh.

Maverick®

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2008, 03:59:10 PM »
I would have to make something up for that SIP floor....

Lessee..... 1 1/2" tall joist w/ bridging......  :-D 

More work than it's worth.    :-)

Josh Nieman

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2008, 04:02:02 PM »
I would think that if Softplan could expand into a more commercial end, they would nab quite a number of users and sell some seats for sure.  I know I was pretty impressed with Softplan... *shrug*

architecture68-raff

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2008, 05:12:33 PM »
I would think that if Softplan could expand into a more commercial end, they would nab quite a number of users and sell some seats for sure.  I know I was pretty impressed with Softplan... *shrug*

We were impressed by the demos of Softplan too...'till we bought a seat of it that is.  We do mostly large-scale custom residential (typically 10,000-25,000 sq. feet) and found it too limiting in customization and certain text related areas.  In the end, we just couldn't get plans to look the way we wanted them to.  Granted, that was v11, and maybe those limitations have been addressed.  Props to Mav and others like him who are able to make it work well...it is impressive in certain areas.
Chicago, Illinois
ADT 2005, Revit Architecture 2009, Sketchup 7

Maverick®

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2008, 05:43:22 PM »

We were impressed by the demos of Softplan too...'till we bought a seat of it that is.  We do mostly large-scale custom residential (typically 10,000-25,000 sq. feet) and found it too limiting in customization and certain text related areas.  In the end, we just couldn't get plans to look the way we wanted them to.  Granted, that was v11, and maybe those limitations have been addressed.  Props to Mav and others like him who are able to make it work well...it is impressive in certain areas.

I have seen a lot of comments on the SP forum from Acad users going to SP.  Most were not happy.  I haven't used AC since college, v12 I think.  It's a different way of drawing from what I understand.  The users that have posted questions have usually been able to do what they wanted but it was just....hard for them to change. 

AFAIK there is no customization in SP.  I have yet to come across a residential project I couldn't model but that doesn't mean they aren't out there.  Granted, doing some of it required workarounds and such but it looks like Acad has it's share of them as well.  Of course I know SP users in my area that don't use half of what it can do.

V14 is coming out next month.  Some pretty cool additions to the program as well as a number of "fixes".

Josh Nieman

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2008, 05:47:58 PM »
I think what I like about it is a lot of the stuff that Autocad Architecture does, as well.  Obviously the price tag for an Autocad vertical is pretty steep, but there's also those other benefits to working with an Autodesk product that make it worth it as well. 

So yea, Softplan is pretty awesome, but in the end if we needed an architectural product... well... I'd probably go to Revit, but if it Autocad Architecture would be the 2nd up.

I'm fine with a "new way of drawing"... I had to overcome that hurdle when I learned Solidworks and Inventor... that was a mindhex.  Going from starting a line command, telling it HOW LONG, and THEN what direction... to drawing a SKETCH (literally just a generic shape that's kind of like your end result) and THEN telling it lengths, angles, etc.... completely backwards... took a bit to get used to.


chance

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #22 on: July 02, 2008, 02:13:31 PM »
To answer the question...thank god...for IFC.....
Architect here, working in very Large E

I have been converting Frame work files...to Triforma V8....then exporting IFC...importing IFC and then working...perfect so far....
then convert back to Microstation J using a 3d seed file to get into SmartPlant Review....

does that help

jnieman

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #23 on: July 02, 2008, 02:20:39 PM »
lol

that flew pretty much over my head (I'm the OP, btw, just in a second pair of shoes)

I still like Revit, but taken a bit of a different philosophy towards my job, and resigned to just making the best with what I got, and worrying less about software.

chance

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #24 on: July 02, 2008, 02:21:21 PM »
This is probably why Autodesk purchased Navisworks - take multiple file types

I think they bought Naviswork and Greenbuilding Studio to slow down the popularity of Graphisoft....both of these products worked seamlessly with Archicad....and so far in my own personal experience, I am finding that Archicad is far superior than Revit...unfortunately I am stuck with autodesk

Dilbert

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #25 on: July 05, 2008, 10:01:01 PM »
I think they bought Naviswork and Greenbuilding Studio to slow down the popularity of Graphisoft....both of these products worked seamlessly with Archicad....and so far in my own personal experience, I am finding that Archicad is far superior than Revit...unfortunately I am stuck with autodesk

Traditionally, Autodesk doesn't purchase software to stifle the competition, they purchase it to incorporate its technology and grow its profit margin with a diversified product line while minimizing start-up and development costs.  This might stifle the competition, but that's just a bi-product of the business decision. The purchase of Navisworks made sense because a common gripe was a lack of interoperability between Autodesk products. Their "green build" purchases are to get their foot in the door in a market segment vital to architecture but an area Autodesk was far behind in (perhaps not even in the game) in terms of technology. It also looks good from a marketing standpoint for everyone from the architect to the client.

Ultimately Autodesk is trying to fortify its position in North America as well as grow its business in Asia (obviously a huge market segment). To do this they need to diversify to compete with the competition.  Thus they are growing the Revit base to leverage the Revit data across a multitude of products that many industries need. To do this they need Navisworks, FM Desktop, and a variety of other programs to leverage the Revit data to make Revit the "AutoCAD" (in terms of usage) of the Architectural segment with each program requiring the other (or working best with them) to produce further growth and profits.   

CADaver

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2008, 08:05:05 AM »
NavisWorks came to the attention of corporate Autodesk when they discovered that over half their own employees had Navisworks running on company machines.  Like most of us, after a quick test run they were impressed with the product.  We've automated our DRI output from SmartPlant review and conversion to Navisworks NWD then include our civil models from Autodesk products.  That way we can use the free Navisworks viewer to view 'Review' entire models from AutoCAD, SmartPlant 3D and PDS.

jjs

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Re: How flexible is Revit's spread across disciplines?
« Reply #27 on: October 06, 2008, 11:11:10 AM »
Revit electrical is not ready for prime time. You have to fake conduit with pipes or duct. Can't do 240V 3P delta systems. Single line diagrams are not done. They bundle it with Autocad for a reason.

That is the only way they can get you to beta test it for free for them.