Author Topic: Timber Frame Detailing  (Read 1563 times)

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42

  • Bull Frog
  • Posts: 483
Timber Frame Detailing
« on: February 13, 2007, 07:16:28 AM »
One for you timber frame detailers out there.
My client (South of England) has commissioned me to produce the construction details for a timber framed house in the New England/Cape Cod style. Whilst I have detailed several timber framed houses, all have been fully brick clad. This house is brick clad up to the second floor and then timber clad up to the eaves.
My question relates to two details.
1. The windows require a surround of 130mm(5"), how do you detail this in the timber and indeed the brick clad walls. I have an idea; however I would like to see how it’s detailed in the States.
2. The second detail is the standoff distance of the timber cladding of approx 150mm (6").  I could detail this with a forest of battens, but do any of you have a stock solution.
I'm not after any particular detail as such, just a bit of guidance.
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Alastair Mallett Autodesk Certified Professional
Technical Director
Hunters South Architects

Keith™

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  • Seagull
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Re: Timber Frame Detailing
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2007, 08:31:21 AM »
unfortunately we don't do any kind of veneer work when using heavy timbers ... we use strictly wood on wood
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CAB

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  • Seagull
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Re: Timber Frame Detailing
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2007, 04:45:32 PM »
I suspect his use of "timber frame" is the same as our "Frame" construction and not our "Heavy Timber" construction.
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Bob Garner

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Re: Timber Frame Detailing
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2007, 06:08:44 PM »
The system that you have shown looks like a typical wood frame structure with brick cladding on the lower floor.  To achieve the "stand-off" of the upper wood cladding (what we call sheathing), you could build studwalls on top of the brick cladding but I don't think that's a good idea since cladding is generally not designed to be load bearing.  It could be added that this is a non load bearing wall above the cladding but this is questionable and you'll prolly get an argument from the Building Department.  Besides, the upper wood wall could transfer lateral wind loads to the brick cladding and brick cladding is seldom designed for this.

Can you turn your floor framing so it is 90° to the wall and cantilever the floor joists out just far enough to support the upper framed wall?  If your framing must parallel the wall, set the joists back from the wall and cantilever out some "lookout" joists to support the wall.  You'll need full blocking between the joists or lookout's where they rest on the wall below.  At this point, you could make this outer wall the upper floor wall and gain a little floor space.

Just some thoughts.

ps:  Where is the weather resistant barrier going to go on the upper wall.  Getting that right will be important.

G'luck.

Bob G.

42

  • Bull Frog
  • Posts: 483
Re: Timber Frame Detailing
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2007, 06:29:12 PM »
CAB. You are correct.
Bob. Thanks a few thoughts that I will look at. The "sheathing" will be designed as rain screen cladding. In so far that water can be expected to pass through the sheathing and run down the rear face. The air gap is in effect a depressurisation zone. The weather proof layer, over here we use a breather layer, will be on the outside face of the frame, it’s the magenta line.
Alastair Mallett Autodesk Certified Professional
Technical Director
Hunters South Architects